A global surveillance system for crop diseases

  • Andy Nelson
  • M. Carvajal-Yepes
  • S. KamounThe Sainsbury Laboratory

Press/Media: Research

Description

The world needs a global system to detect and halt the spread of emerging crop diseases

In the same manner that nations collaborate to detect and stop human pandemics, a global surveillance system for crop diseases needs to be created to safeguard agricultural trade and food security, argues a team of experts in Science

More than 20 percent of the five staple crops that provide half the globe's caloric intake are lost to pests each year. Climate change and global trade drive the spread, emergence, and re-emergence of crop disease, and containment action is often inefficient, especially in low-income countries. A Global Surveillance System (GSS) to strengthen and interconnect crop biosecurity systems could go a long way to improving global food security, argues a team of experts in the June 28 issue of Science.

 

Period27 Jun 2019 → 28 Jun 2019

Media contributions

3

Media contributions

  • Titleworld needs a global system to detect and halt spread of crop disease
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletU. Twente
    Media typeWeb
    CountryNetherlands
    Date28/06/19
    DescriptionCrop pests and diseases pose a threat to global food supplies. More than 20 percent of the five staple crops that provide half the globe’s caloric intake are lost to pests each year. While national and regional systems are in place to monitor and contain outbreaks, the capacity to do this effectively is often lacking, especially in low-income countries. Global trade and a changing climate affect the distribution and impact of pests and diseases leading to emergence in new areas or re-emergence in areas previously thought to be under control.

    URLhttps://www.utwente.nl/en/news/2019/6/346872/world-needs-a-global-system-to-detect-and-halt-spread-of-crop-disease
    PersonsAndy Nelson
  • TitleThe world needs a global system to detect and halt the spread of emerging crop diseases
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletAAAS and EurekAlert!
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date27/06/19
    DescriptionIn the same manner that nations collaborate to detect and stop human pandemics, a global surveillance system for crop diseases needs to be created to safeguard agricultural trade and food security, argues a team of experts in Science

    More than 20 percent of the five staple crops that provide half the globe's caloric intake are lost to pests each year. Climate change and global trade drive the spread, emergence, and re-emergence of crop disease, and containment action is often inefficient, especially in low-income countries. A Global Surveillance System (GSS) to strengthen and interconnect crop biosecurity systems could go a long way to improving global food security, argues a team of experts in the June 28 issue of Science.
    URLhttps://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-06/icft-twn062119.php
    PersonsM. Carvajal-Yepes, Andy Nelson
  • TitleWorld not prepared for next plant health emergency, scientists warn
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletSeedQuest
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date27/06/19
    DescriptionScientists at The Sainsbury Laboratory, along with partners at CIAT, the John Innes Centre and elsewhere warn that we are not fully prepared to tackle the rise in new epidemics of plant diseases.

    In a paper published in Science, Professor Sophien Kamoun and colleagues are proposing a Global Surveillance System (GSS) that will extend and adapt established biosecurity practices and networking facilities.

    TSL Group Leader Kamoun explains; “Outbreaks of crop diseases are increasing at an alarming rate. We need a new way of doing business. The GSS would be a great step forward. I’m thrilled that GSS recognises the importance of open science platforms and networks that are critical to an efficient rapid response to these emergencies.”

    As the paper notes; “To satisfy growing demand for food, global agricultural production must increase by 70% by 2050. However, pests and crop diseases put global food supplies at risk. Worldwide, yield losses caused by pests and diseases are estimated to average 21.5% in wheat, 30.0% in rice, 22.6% in maize, 17.2% in potato, and 21.4% in soybean; these crops account for half of the global human calorie intake.
    URLhttps://www.seedquest.com/forum.php?type=solution&id_article=108055
    PersonsS. Kamoun, Andy Nelson