A Feasibility Study in Measuring Soft Tissue Artifacts on the Upper Leg Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors

D. Weenk, Alien G. Stevens, Bart H.W. Koning, Bernhard J.F. van Beijnum, Hermanus J. Hermens, Petrus H. Veltink

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

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Abstract

Soft-tissue artifacts cause inaccurate estimates of body segment orientations. The inertial sensor (or optical marker) is orientating (or displacing) with respect to the bone it has to measure, due to muscle and skin movement [1]. In this pilot study 11 inertial and magnetic sensors (MTw, Xsens Technologies) were placed on the rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (upper leg). One sensor was positioned on the tendon plate behind the quadriceps (iliotibial tract, as used in Xsens MVN [1]) and used as reference sensor. Walking, active and passive knee extensions and muscle contractions without flexion/extension were recorded using one subject. The orientation of each sensor with respect to the reference sensor was calculated. During walking, relative orientations of up to 28.6º were measured (22.4±3.6º). During muscle contractions without flexion/extension the largest relative orientations were measured on the rectus femoris (up to 11.1º) [2]. This pilot showed that the ambulatory measurement of deformation of the upper leg is feasible; however, improving the measurement technology is required. We therefore have designed a new inertial and magnetic sensor system containing smaller sensors, based on the design of an instrumented glove for the assessment of hand kinematics [3]. This new sensor system will then be used to investigate soft-tissue artifacts more accurately; in particular we will focus on in-use estimation and elimination of these artifacts.
Original languageUndefined
Title of host publicationFourth Dutch Conference on Bio-Medical Engineering
Place of PublicationEgmond aan Zee, The Netherlands
PublisherBME
Pages154-154
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)not assigned
Publication statusPublished - 24 Jan 2013
Event4th Dutch Bio-Medical Engineering Conference, BME 2013 - Hotel Zuiderduin, Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands
Duration: 24 Jan 201325 Jan 2013
Conference number: 4
http://www.bme2013.nl/

Publication series

Name
PublisherBME

Conference

Conference4th Dutch Bio-Medical Engineering Conference, BME 2013
Abbreviated titleBME
CountryNetherlands
CityEgmond aan Zee
Period24/01/1325/01/13
OtherFourth Dutch BME Conference
Internet address

Keywords

  • EWI-23011
  • IR-83738
  • METIS-296273
  • BSS-Biomechatronics and rehabilitation technology

Cite this

Weenk, D., Stevens, A. G., Koning, B. H. W., van Beijnum, B. J. F., Hermens, H. J., & Veltink, P. H. (2013). A Feasibility Study in Measuring Soft Tissue Artifacts on the Upper Leg Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors. In Fourth Dutch Conference on Bio-Medical Engineering (pp. 154-154). Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands: BME.
Weenk, D. ; Stevens, Alien G. ; Koning, Bart H.W. ; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F. ; Hermens, Hermanus J. ; Veltink, Petrus H. / A Feasibility Study in Measuring Soft Tissue Artifacts on the Upper Leg Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors. Fourth Dutch Conference on Bio-Medical Engineering. Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands : BME, 2013. pp. 154-154
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title = "A Feasibility Study in Measuring Soft Tissue Artifacts on the Upper Leg Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors",
abstract = "Soft-tissue artifacts cause inaccurate estimates of body segment orientations. The inertial sensor (or optical marker) is orientating (or displacing) with respect to the bone it has to measure, due to muscle and skin movement [1]. In this pilot study 11 inertial and magnetic sensors (MTw, Xsens Technologies) were placed on the rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (upper leg). One sensor was positioned on the tendon plate behind the quadriceps (iliotibial tract, as used in Xsens MVN [1]) and used as reference sensor. Walking, active and passive knee extensions and muscle contractions without flexion/extension were recorded using one subject. The orientation of each sensor with respect to the reference sensor was calculated. During walking, relative orientations of up to 28.6º were measured (22.4±3.6º). During muscle contractions without flexion/extension the largest relative orientations were measured on the rectus femoris (up to 11.1º) [2]. This pilot showed that the ambulatory measurement of deformation of the upper leg is feasible; however, improving the measurement technology is required. We therefore have designed a new inertial and magnetic sensor system containing smaller sensors, based on the design of an instrumented glove for the assessment of hand kinematics [3]. This new sensor system will then be used to investigate soft-tissue artifacts more accurately; in particular we will focus on in-use estimation and elimination of these artifacts.",
keywords = "EWI-23011, IR-83738, METIS-296273, BSS-Biomechatronics and rehabilitation technology",
author = "D. Weenk and Stevens, {Alien G.} and Koning, {Bart H.W.} and {van Beijnum}, {Bernhard J.F.} and Hermens, {Hermanus J.} and Veltink, {Petrus H.}",
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Weenk, D, Stevens, AG, Koning, BHW, van Beijnum, BJF, Hermens, HJ & Veltink, PH 2013, A Feasibility Study in Measuring Soft Tissue Artifacts on the Upper Leg Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors. in Fourth Dutch Conference on Bio-Medical Engineering. BME, Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands, pp. 154-154, 4th Dutch Bio-Medical Engineering Conference, BME 2013, Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands, 24/01/13.

A Feasibility Study in Measuring Soft Tissue Artifacts on the Upper Leg Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors. / Weenk, D.; Stevens, Alien G.; Koning, Bart H.W.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

Fourth Dutch Conference on Bio-Medical Engineering. Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands : BME, 2013. p. 154-154.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

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AU - Weenk, D.

AU - Stevens, Alien G.

AU - Koning, Bart H.W.

AU - van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.

AU - Hermens, Hermanus J.

AU - Veltink, Petrus H.

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N2 - Soft-tissue artifacts cause inaccurate estimates of body segment orientations. The inertial sensor (or optical marker) is orientating (or displacing) with respect to the bone it has to measure, due to muscle and skin movement [1]. In this pilot study 11 inertial and magnetic sensors (MTw, Xsens Technologies) were placed on the rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (upper leg). One sensor was positioned on the tendon plate behind the quadriceps (iliotibial tract, as used in Xsens MVN [1]) and used as reference sensor. Walking, active and passive knee extensions and muscle contractions without flexion/extension were recorded using one subject. The orientation of each sensor with respect to the reference sensor was calculated. During walking, relative orientations of up to 28.6º were measured (22.4±3.6º). During muscle contractions without flexion/extension the largest relative orientations were measured on the rectus femoris (up to 11.1º) [2]. This pilot showed that the ambulatory measurement of deformation of the upper leg is feasible; however, improving the measurement technology is required. We therefore have designed a new inertial and magnetic sensor system containing smaller sensors, based on the design of an instrumented glove for the assessment of hand kinematics [3]. This new sensor system will then be used to investigate soft-tissue artifacts more accurately; in particular we will focus on in-use estimation and elimination of these artifacts.

AB - Soft-tissue artifacts cause inaccurate estimates of body segment orientations. The inertial sensor (or optical marker) is orientating (or displacing) with respect to the bone it has to measure, due to muscle and skin movement [1]. In this pilot study 11 inertial and magnetic sensors (MTw, Xsens Technologies) were placed on the rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (upper leg). One sensor was positioned on the tendon plate behind the quadriceps (iliotibial tract, as used in Xsens MVN [1]) and used as reference sensor. Walking, active and passive knee extensions and muscle contractions without flexion/extension were recorded using one subject. The orientation of each sensor with respect to the reference sensor was calculated. During walking, relative orientations of up to 28.6º were measured (22.4±3.6º). During muscle contractions without flexion/extension the largest relative orientations were measured on the rectus femoris (up to 11.1º) [2]. This pilot showed that the ambulatory measurement of deformation of the upper leg is feasible; however, improving the measurement technology is required. We therefore have designed a new inertial and magnetic sensor system containing smaller sensors, based on the design of an instrumented glove for the assessment of hand kinematics [3]. This new sensor system will then be used to investigate soft-tissue artifacts more accurately; in particular we will focus on in-use estimation and elimination of these artifacts.

KW - EWI-23011

KW - IR-83738

KW - METIS-296273

KW - BSS-Biomechatronics and rehabilitation technology

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - not assigned

SP - 154

EP - 154

BT - Fourth Dutch Conference on Bio-Medical Engineering

PB - BME

CY - Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands

ER -

Weenk D, Stevens AG, Koning BHW, van Beijnum BJF, Hermens HJ, Veltink PH. A Feasibility Study in Measuring Soft Tissue Artifacts on the Upper Leg Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors. In Fourth Dutch Conference on Bio-Medical Engineering. Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands: BME. 2013. p. 154-154