A forecasting model for the evaluation of future resource availability

Mark Mennenga, Sebastian Thiede, Jan Beier, Tina Dettmer, Sami Kara, Christoph Herrmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural resource availability and scarcity have become a central concern for the mid- and long-term economic development. Much of this relies on non-renewable resources, which are limited in their total availability. The aim of this paper is to develop a quantitative forecasting model which evaluates future resource availability. A focus is set on non-renewable resources in Australia. The presented model is based on existing statistical approaches for predicting future resource availability. From its application possible implications for Australia are revealed. The general results are complemented with a brief case study that assesses the introduction of electric vehicles and its impact on resource availability.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLeveraging Technology for a Sustainable World
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 19th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, USA, May 23 - 25, 2012
EditorsDavid A. Dornfeld, Barbara S. Linke
Place of PublicationBerlin, Heidelberg
PublisherSpringer
Pages449-454
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-642-29069-5
ISBN (Print)978-3-642-29068-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event19th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, LCE 2012: Leveraging Technology for a Sustainable World - Berkeley, United States
Duration: 23 May 201225 May 2012

Conference

Conference19th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, LCE 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBerkeley
Period23/05/1225/05/12

Keywords

  • Electric mobility
  • Forecasting model
  • Limited resources
  • Resource availability

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