A formula for determination of the roughness height for turbulent heat transfer between the land surface and the atmosphere over bare soil surfaces

Z. Su*, R. Zhang, X. Sun, Z. Zhu, S. Liu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Roughness height for heat transfer is a crucial parameter in estimation of heat transfer between the land surface and the atmosphere, especially when radiometric measurements are used. Although many empirical formulations have been proposed, the uncertainties associated with these formulations are shown to be large, especially over sparse canopies. In this contribution, a simple physically based formula is derived for the estimation of the roughness height for heat transfer for bare soil surfaces. The new formula is validated with measurements collected in a filed campaign in Xiaotangshan, near Beijing, China in 2002. The present model is further shown to be able to explain the diurnal variation in the roughness height for heat transfer. The turbulent heat fluxes estimated using radiometric measurements as inputs are markedly improved when this new formula is used.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIGARSS 2003
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings 2003 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherIEEE
Pages3202-3204
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)0-7803-7929-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Nov 2003
Externally publishedYes
EventIEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS 2003: Learning From Earth's Shapes and Colours - Toulouse, France
Duration: 21 Jul 200325 Jul 2003

Conference

ConferenceIEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS 2003
Abbreviated titleIGARSS 2003
CountryFrance
CityToulouse
Period21/07/0325/07/03

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