A generic drift reduction technique for orientation estimation from biomechanical angular velocity

Anne Haitjema, Frank J. Wouda, Jasper Reenalda, Kim Sunesen, Bert-Jan F. van Beijnum, Peter H. Veltink

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Abstract

Inertial measurement units are used in ambulatory human movement analysis, but their use is often subject to domain- or application-specific assumptions and methods to compensate for drift in kinematic estimations. Here, we propose and evaluate a generic drift reduction technique for orientation estimation. A second order Taylor approximation for 3D orientation estimation from sampled angular velocity is derived and evaluated on a publicly available dataset containing angular velocity data of 4 runners. The use of a second order Taylor approximation substantially reduces drift when the angular velocity has considerable contributions along all three axes. The second order Taylor approximation could therefore facilitate the use of minimal sensor setups for the study of dynamic 3D human movements.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2023 IEEE 19th International Conference on Body Sensor Networks (BSN)
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)979-8-3503-3841-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2023
Event19th International Conference on Body Sensor Networks – Sensors and Systems for Digital Health, IEEE BSN 2023 - Boston, United States
Duration: 9 Oct 202311 Oct 2023
Conference number: 19

Conference

Conference19th International Conference on Body Sensor Networks – Sensors and Systems for Digital Health, IEEE BSN 2023
Abbreviated titleIEEE BSN 2023
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBoston
Period9/10/2311/10/23

Keywords

  • Inertial measurement unit (IMU)
  • gyroscope
  • drift
  • orientation tracking
  • ambulatory movement analysis
  • 2023 OA procedure

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