A Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics of spatial mechanisms using Lie Groups and Screw Theory

Stefano Stramigioli, Bernhard Maschke, Catherine Bidard

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    Abstract

    In this paper two main topics are treated. In the first part we give a synthetic presentation of the geometry of rigid body motion in a projective geometrical framework. An important issue is the geometric approach to the identification of twists and wrenches in a Lie group approach and their relation to screws. In the second part we give a formulation of the dynamics of multibody systems in terms of implicit port controlled Hamiltonian system defined with respect to Dirac structures.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of a symposium commemorating the legacy, works, and life of Sir robert Stawell Ball
    Subtitle of host publicationUpon the 100th anniversary of 'A Treatise on the Theory of Screws'
    Place of PublicationCambridge, UK
    PublisherUniversity of Cambridge
    Number of pages28
    Publication statusPublished - 2000
    EventSymposium Commemorating the Legacy, Works, and Life of Sir Robert Stawell BALL 2000 - University of Cambridge, Trinity College, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Duration: 9 Jul 200012 Jul 2000

    Conference

    ConferenceSymposium Commemorating the Legacy, Works, and Life of Sir Robert Stawell BALL 2000
    Abbreviated titleBALL 2000
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityCambridge
    Period9/07/0012/07/00

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  • Cite this

    Stramigioli, S., Maschke, B., & Bidard, C. (2000). A Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics of spatial mechanisms using Lie Groups and Screw Theory. In Proceedings of a symposium commemorating the legacy, works, and life of Sir robert Stawell Ball: Upon the 100th anniversary of 'A Treatise on the Theory of Screws' Cambridge, UK: University of Cambridge.