A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

Martin Luckabauer, Wolfgang Sprengel, Roland Würschum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

Original languageEnglish
Article number075116
JournalReview of scientific instruments
Volume87
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2016
Externally publishedYes

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