A Meta-Analysis on the Differences in Mathematical and Cognitive Skills Between Individuals With and Without Mathematical Learning Disabilities

Evelyn H. Kroesbergen, Marije D.E. Huijsmans*, Ilona Friso-van den Bos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
170 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Types of mathematical learning disability (MLD) are very heterogeneous. Lower scores on mathematics and several cognitive skills have been revealed in samples with MLD compared with those with typical development (TD), but these studies vary in sample selection, making it difficult to generalize conclusions. Furthermore, many studies have investigated only one or few cognitive skills, making it difficult to compare their relative discrepancies. The current meta-analysis (k = 145) was conducted to (a) give a state-of-the-art overview of the mathematical and cognitive skills associated with MLD and (b) investigate how selection criteria influence conclusions regarding this topic. Results indicated that people with MLD display lower scores not only on mathematics but also on number sense, working memory, and rapid automatized naming compared with those with TD, in general independently of the criteria used to define MLD. A profile that distinguishes people with more serious, persistent, or specific MLD from those with less severe MLD was not detected.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)718-755
Number of pages38
JournalReview of educational research
Volume93
Issue number5
Early online date3 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2023

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Developmental dyscalculia
  • Effect size
  • Individual differences
  • Mathematical learning disability
  • Mathematics education
  • Meta-analysis
  • Number sense
  • Rapid automatized naming
  • Working memory

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