A Multi-Week Assessment of a Mobile Exergame Intervention in an Elementary School

Ainara Garde, Manil Chowdhury, Aryannah U. Rollinson, Mika Johnson, Paul Prescod, Jean Pierre Chanoine, John Mark Ansermino, Guy A. Dumont

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Exergaming is potentially useful to promote physical activity in children; however, long-term effectiveness is unclear. MobileKids Monster Manor (MKMM) is a mobile exergame developed with the help of young advisors. The game wirelessly transmits physical activity data from an accelerometer to a mobile device. Players’ steps are redeemed for in-game rewards, for example, new characters. Objective: First, to evaluate whether increased physical activity previously observed in a 1-week intervention is sustained over a 2-week intervention and 1-week follow-up, and second, to compare impact in schools within different socioeconomic environments. Methods: Thirty-seven elementary school students participated in a 4-week randomized controlled study (1- week baseline; 2-week intervention [with only the Game group receiving MKMM]; and 1-week follow-up). All participants wore a Tractivity accelerometer throughout. Linear mixed models were applied to assess sustainability; a second 42-children-based dataset and age-/sex-adjusted linear regression models were used to compare effect across socioeconomic environments. Results: In the first week of intervention, the Game group compared to the Control group showed a greater increase in physical activity (of 1,758 steps/day [95% confidence interval, CI = 133–3,385] and 31 active minutes/ day [95% CI = 4–59]), relative to baseline (13,986 steps/day; 231 active minutes/day). However, this was not sustained in the second intervention week or follow-up. The school within a lower socioeconomic status environment showed lower baseline activity and the 1-week intervention resulted in a greater increase relative to baseline (3,633 steps/day more [95% CI = 1,281–5,985]). Conclusion: MKMM could be a useful short-term physical activity promotion tool; however, effectiveness may decrease as novelty diminishes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)43-50
    Number of pages8
    JournalGames for health
    Volume7
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

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    Accelerometers
    elementary school
    Exercise
    Economic and social effects
    Linear Models
    Linear regression
    Mobile devices
    Sustainable development
    Wear of materials
    Students
    socioeconomic effects
    Reward
    Social Class
    Group
    school
    reward
    social status
    Confidence Intervals
    promotion
    Equipment and Supplies

    Cite this

    Garde, A., Chowdhury, M., Rollinson, A. U., Johnson, M., Prescod, P., Chanoine, J. P., ... Dumont, G. A. (2018). A Multi-Week Assessment of a Mobile Exergame Intervention in an Elementary School. Games for health, 7(1), 43-50. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2017.0023
    Garde, Ainara ; Chowdhury, Manil ; Rollinson, Aryannah U. ; Johnson, Mika ; Prescod, Paul ; Chanoine, Jean Pierre ; Ansermino, John Mark ; Dumont, Guy A. / A Multi-Week Assessment of a Mobile Exergame Intervention in an Elementary School. In: Games for health. 2018 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 43-50.
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    title = "A Multi-Week Assessment of a Mobile Exergame Intervention in an Elementary School",
    abstract = "Background: Exergaming is potentially useful to promote physical activity in children; however, long-term effectiveness is unclear. MobileKids Monster Manor (MKMM) is a mobile exergame developed with the help of young advisors. The game wirelessly transmits physical activity data from an accelerometer to a mobile device. Players’ steps are redeemed for in-game rewards, for example, new characters. Objective: First, to evaluate whether increased physical activity previously observed in a 1-week intervention is sustained over a 2-week intervention and 1-week follow-up, and second, to compare impact in schools within different socioeconomic environments. Methods: Thirty-seven elementary school students participated in a 4-week randomized controlled study (1- week baseline; 2-week intervention [with only the Game group receiving MKMM]; and 1-week follow-up). All participants wore a Tractivity accelerometer throughout. Linear mixed models were applied to assess sustainability; a second 42-children-based dataset and age-/sex-adjusted linear regression models were used to compare effect across socioeconomic environments. Results: In the first week of intervention, the Game group compared to the Control group showed a greater increase in physical activity (of 1,758 steps/day [95{\%} confidence interval, CI = 133–3,385] and 31 active minutes/ day [95{\%} CI = 4–59]), relative to baseline (13,986 steps/day; 231 active minutes/day). However, this was not sustained in the second intervention week or follow-up. The school within a lower socioeconomic status environment showed lower baseline activity and the 1-week intervention resulted in a greater increase relative to baseline (3,633 steps/day more [95{\%} CI = 1,281–5,985]). Conclusion: MKMM could be a useful short-term physical activity promotion tool; however, effectiveness may decrease as novelty diminishes.",
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    Garde, A, Chowdhury, M, Rollinson, AU, Johnson, M, Prescod, P, Chanoine, JP, Ansermino, JM & Dumont, GA 2018, 'A Multi-Week Assessment of a Mobile Exergame Intervention in an Elementary School', Games for health, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 43-50. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2017.0023

    A Multi-Week Assessment of a Mobile Exergame Intervention in an Elementary School. / Garde, Ainara; Chowdhury, Manil; Rollinson, Aryannah U.; Johnson, Mika; Prescod, Paul; Chanoine, Jean Pierre; Ansermino, John Mark; Dumont, Guy A.

    In: Games for health, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 43-50.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    AU - Garde, Ainara

    AU - Chowdhury, Manil

    AU - Rollinson, Aryannah U.

    AU - Johnson, Mika

    AU - Prescod, Paul

    AU - Chanoine, Jean Pierre

    AU - Ansermino, John Mark

    AU - Dumont, Guy A.

    PY - 2018/2/1

    Y1 - 2018/2/1

    N2 - Background: Exergaming is potentially useful to promote physical activity in children; however, long-term effectiveness is unclear. MobileKids Monster Manor (MKMM) is a mobile exergame developed with the help of young advisors. The game wirelessly transmits physical activity data from an accelerometer to a mobile device. Players’ steps are redeemed for in-game rewards, for example, new characters. Objective: First, to evaluate whether increased physical activity previously observed in a 1-week intervention is sustained over a 2-week intervention and 1-week follow-up, and second, to compare impact in schools within different socioeconomic environments. Methods: Thirty-seven elementary school students participated in a 4-week randomized controlled study (1- week baseline; 2-week intervention [with only the Game group receiving MKMM]; and 1-week follow-up). All participants wore a Tractivity accelerometer throughout. Linear mixed models were applied to assess sustainability; a second 42-children-based dataset and age-/sex-adjusted linear regression models were used to compare effect across socioeconomic environments. Results: In the first week of intervention, the Game group compared to the Control group showed a greater increase in physical activity (of 1,758 steps/day [95% confidence interval, CI = 133–3,385] and 31 active minutes/ day [95% CI = 4–59]), relative to baseline (13,986 steps/day; 231 active minutes/day). However, this was not sustained in the second intervention week or follow-up. The school within a lower socioeconomic status environment showed lower baseline activity and the 1-week intervention resulted in a greater increase relative to baseline (3,633 steps/day more [95% CI = 1,281–5,985]). Conclusion: MKMM could be a useful short-term physical activity promotion tool; however, effectiveness may decrease as novelty diminishes.

    AB - Background: Exergaming is potentially useful to promote physical activity in children; however, long-term effectiveness is unclear. MobileKids Monster Manor (MKMM) is a mobile exergame developed with the help of young advisors. The game wirelessly transmits physical activity data from an accelerometer to a mobile device. Players’ steps are redeemed for in-game rewards, for example, new characters. Objective: First, to evaluate whether increased physical activity previously observed in a 1-week intervention is sustained over a 2-week intervention and 1-week follow-up, and second, to compare impact in schools within different socioeconomic environments. Methods: Thirty-seven elementary school students participated in a 4-week randomized controlled study (1- week baseline; 2-week intervention [with only the Game group receiving MKMM]; and 1-week follow-up). All participants wore a Tractivity accelerometer throughout. Linear mixed models were applied to assess sustainability; a second 42-children-based dataset and age-/sex-adjusted linear regression models were used to compare effect across socioeconomic environments. Results: In the first week of intervention, the Game group compared to the Control group showed a greater increase in physical activity (of 1,758 steps/day [95% confidence interval, CI = 133–3,385] and 31 active minutes/ day [95% CI = 4–59]), relative to baseline (13,986 steps/day; 231 active minutes/day). However, this was not sustained in the second intervention week or follow-up. The school within a lower socioeconomic status environment showed lower baseline activity and the 1-week intervention resulted in a greater increase relative to baseline (3,633 steps/day more [95% CI = 1,281–5,985]). Conclusion: MKMM could be a useful short-term physical activity promotion tool; however, effectiveness may decrease as novelty diminishes.

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    Garde A, Chowdhury M, Rollinson AU, Johnson M, Prescod P, Chanoine JP et al. A Multi-Week Assessment of a Mobile Exergame Intervention in an Elementary School. Games for health. 2018 Feb 1;7(1):43-50. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2017.0023