A novel self-aligning mechanism to decouple force and torques for a planar exoskeleton joint

J.F. Schorsch, Arvid Quintijn Leon Keemink, Arno Stienen, F.C.T. van der Helm, D.A. Abbink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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142 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The design of exoskeletons is a popular and promising area of research both for restoring lost function and rehabilitation, and for augmentation in military and industrial applications. A major practical challenge to the comfort and usability for exoskeletons is the need to avoid misalignment of the exoskeletal joint with the underlying human joint. Alignment mismatches are difficult to prevent due to large inter-user variability, and can create large stresses on the attachment system and underlying human anatomy. Previous self-aligning systems have been proposed in literature, which can compensate for muscle forces, but leave large residual forces passed directly to the skeletal system. In this paper we propose a new mechanism to reduce misalignment complications. A decoupling approach is proposed which allows large forces to be carried by the exoskeletal system while allowing both the muscle and skeletal joint force presented to the user to be compensated to any desired degree
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-35
Number of pages7
JournalMechanical sciences
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Muscle
Torque
Military applications
Patient rehabilitation
Industrial applications

Keywords

  • IR-97551
  • METIS-307708

Cite this

Schorsch, J.F. ; Keemink, Arvid Quintijn Leon ; Stienen, Arno ; van der Helm, F.C.T. ; Abbink, D.A. / A novel self-aligning mechanism to decouple force and torques for a planar exoskeleton joint. In: Mechanical sciences. 2014 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 29-35.
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A novel self-aligning mechanism to decouple force and torques for a planar exoskeleton joint. / Schorsch, J.F.; Keemink, Arvid Quintijn Leon; Stienen, Arno; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Abbink, D.A.

In: Mechanical sciences, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2014, p. 29-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A novel self-aligning mechanism to decouple force and torques for a planar exoskeleton joint

AU - Schorsch, J.F.

AU - Keemink, Arvid Quintijn Leon

AU - Stienen, Arno

AU - van der Helm, F.C.T.

AU - Abbink, D.A.

N1 - Open access

PY - 2014

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AB - The design of exoskeletons is a popular and promising area of research both for restoring lost function and rehabilitation, and for augmentation in military and industrial applications. A major practical challenge to the comfort and usability for exoskeletons is the need to avoid misalignment of the exoskeletal joint with the underlying human joint. Alignment mismatches are difficult to prevent due to large inter-user variability, and can create large stresses on the attachment system and underlying human anatomy. Previous self-aligning systems have been proposed in literature, which can compensate for muscle forces, but leave large residual forces passed directly to the skeletal system. In this paper we propose a new mechanism to reduce misalignment complications. A decoupling approach is proposed which allows large forces to be carried by the exoskeletal system while allowing both the muscle and skeletal joint force presented to the user to be compensated to any desired degree

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