A review of methods for evaluating the fit of item score patterns on a test

R.R. Meijer, Klaas Sijtsma

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

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Abstract

Methods are discussed that can be used to investigate the fit of an item score pattern to a test model. Model-based tests and personality inventories are administered to more than 100 million people a year and, as a result, individual fit is of great concern. Item Response Theory (IRT) modeling and person-fit statistics that are formulated in the context of IRT take a prominent place in the literature. Person-fit statistics are extensively discussed in this paper. Also, methods formulated outside the IRT context and methods to investigate particular types of response behavior are discussed. The aim of this paper is to give the researcher an idea of the possibilities in this research area by emphasizing the similarities of most person-fit methods and by discussing the pros and cons of the methods.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationEnschede
PublisherUniversity of Twente, Faculty Educational Science and Technology
Number of pages50
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Publication series

NameOMD research report
PublisherUniversity of Twente, Faculty of Educational Science and Technology
No.99-01

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Keywords

  • Personality Measures
  • Test Construction
  • IR-104141
  • Evaluation Methods
  • METIS-136408
  • Item Response Theory
  • Scores
  • Test Items
  • Goodness of Fit

Cite this

Meijer, R. R., & Sijtsma, K. (1999). A review of methods for evaluating the fit of item score patterns on a test. (OMD research report; No. 99-01). Enschede: University of Twente, Faculty Educational Science and Technology.
Meijer, R.R. ; Sijtsma, Klaas. / A review of methods for evaluating the fit of item score patterns on a test. Enschede : University of Twente, Faculty Educational Science and Technology, 1999. 50 p. (OMD research report; 99-01).
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Meijer, RR & Sijtsma, K 1999, A review of methods for evaluating the fit of item score patterns on a test. OMD research report, no. 99-01, University of Twente, Faculty Educational Science and Technology, Enschede.

A review of methods for evaluating the fit of item score patterns on a test. / Meijer, R.R.; Sijtsma, Klaas.

Enschede : University of Twente, Faculty Educational Science and Technology, 1999. 50 p. (OMD research report; No. 99-01).

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

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Meijer RR, Sijtsma K. A review of methods for evaluating the fit of item score patterns on a test. Enschede: University of Twente, Faculty Educational Science and Technology, 1999. 50 p. (OMD research report; 99-01).