Academic and social integration of international and local students at five business schools, a cross-institutional comparison

Bart Rienties, Therese Grohnert, Piet Kommers, Susan Niemantsverdriet, Jan Nijhuis

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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    Abstract

    An increasing number of students choose to study at a university in a foreign country. A common belief among educators is that international students are insufficiently academically adjusted. Recent research has found a mixed picture on whether international students underperform in academic integration and academic performance. Therefore, Morrison et al. (2005) argue that research should extend its focus to understanding the underlying reasons for these performance differences of international versus local students.In a cross-institutional comparison among 871 students of five business schools, we investigated the differences in academic and social integration amongst local and international students. International students value their faculty and educational system more than local students. However, international and local students have limited social contact with each other and spend their private time differently. Finally, students with a non-Western background are less integrated than Western students, have considerable lower academic and social integration scores and have (marginally) lower grade point average (GPA) and European credit transfer system (ECTS) scores. Institutes with small classes and collaborative learning settings seem to provide a more favourable learning environment for international students.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationBuilding Learning Experiences in a Changing World
    EditorsPiet van den Bossche, Wim. H. Gijselaers, Richard G. Miller
    Place of PublicationDordrecht
    PublisherSpringer
    Pages121-137
    ISBN (Electronic)978-94-007-0802-0
    ISBN (Print)978-94-007-0801-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Publication series

    NameAdvances in Business Education and Training (ABET)
    PublisherSpringer
    Volume3

    Fingerprint

    business school
    social integration
    student
    social relations
    foreign countries
    educational system
    performance
    credit
    learning environment
    educator

    Keywords

    • METIS-282955

    Cite this

    Rienties, B., Grohnert, T., Kommers, P., Niemantsverdriet, S., & Nijhuis, J. (2011). Academic and social integration of international and local students at five business schools, a cross-institutional comparison. In P. van den Bossche, W. H. Gijselaers, & R. G. Miller (Eds.), Building Learning Experiences in a Changing World (pp. 121-137). (Advances in Business Education and Training (ABET); Vol. 3). Dordrecht: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0802-0_8
    Rienties, Bart ; Grohnert, Therese ; Kommers, Piet ; Niemantsverdriet, Susan ; Nijhuis, Jan. / Academic and social integration of international and local students at five business schools, a cross-institutional comparison. Building Learning Experiences in a Changing World. editor / Piet van den Bossche ; Wim. H. Gijselaers ; Richard G. Miller. Dordrecht : Springer, 2011. pp. 121-137 (Advances in Business Education and Training (ABET)).
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    Rienties, B, Grohnert, T, Kommers, P, Niemantsverdriet, S & Nijhuis, J 2011, Academic and social integration of international and local students at five business schools, a cross-institutional comparison. in P van den Bossche, WH Gijselaers & RG Miller (eds), Building Learning Experiences in a Changing World. Advances in Business Education and Training (ABET), vol. 3, Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 121-137. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0802-0_8

    Academic and social integration of international and local students at five business schools, a cross-institutional comparison. / Rienties, Bart; Grohnert, Therese; Kommers, Piet; Niemantsverdriet, Susan; Nijhuis, Jan.

    Building Learning Experiences in a Changing World. ed. / Piet van den Bossche; Wim. H. Gijselaers; Richard G. Miller. Dordrecht : Springer, 2011. p. 121-137 (Advances in Business Education and Training (ABET); Vol. 3).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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    AB - An increasing number of students choose to study at a university in a foreign country. A common belief among educators is that international students are insufficiently academically adjusted. Recent research has found a mixed picture on whether international students underperform in academic integration and academic performance. Therefore, Morrison et al. (2005) argue that research should extend its focus to understanding the underlying reasons for these performance differences of international versus local students.In a cross-institutional comparison among 871 students of five business schools, we investigated the differences in academic and social integration amongst local and international students. International students value their faculty and educational system more than local students. However, international and local students have limited social contact with each other and spend their private time differently. Finally, students with a non-Western background are less integrated than Western students, have considerable lower academic and social integration scores and have (marginally) lower grade point average (GPA) and European credit transfer system (ECTS) scores. Institutes with small classes and collaborative learning settings seem to provide a more favourable learning environment for international students.

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    Rienties B, Grohnert T, Kommers P, Niemantsverdriet S, Nijhuis J. Academic and social integration of international and local students at five business schools, a cross-institutional comparison. In van den Bossche P, Gijselaers WH, Miller RG, editors, Building Learning Experiences in a Changing World. Dordrecht: Springer. 2011. p. 121-137. (Advances in Business Education and Training (ABET)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0802-0_8