Accessibility: theory and practice in the Netherlands and UK

Karst Teunis Geurs, Derek Halden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Accessibility is a concept that has become central to physical planning during the past 50 years; improving accessibility is an aim that has now made its way into mainstream transport planning and policymaking throughout the world. Batty (2009) traces the origins of the concept back to the 1920s. It was used in location theory and regional economic planning, becoming important once transport planning began, mainly in North America where it was associated with transport networks and trip distribution patterns. Its conceptual basis dates back further. Hansen (1959), in his classic and much cited expose, ‘How accessibility shapes land use’ rolled out our first real definition: the potential for interaction (based on the notion of potential traced back to the social physics school in the nineteenth century). Several authors have written review articles on accessibility measures, often focusing on a particular category of accessibility, such as location-based accessibility (Martin and Reggiani, 2007; Reggiani, 1998), person-based accessibility (e.g., Kwan, 1998; Pirie, 1979) or utility-based accessibility (e.g., Koenig, 1980; Niemeier, 1997). Here we use the review of Geurs and van Wee (2004), as a point of departure to look at accessibility measures from different perspectives (land use, transport, social as well as economic impacts). We also use the typology of accessibility measures developed by Halden, which classified accessibility measures according to the ways in which they had been successfully used (Halden, 2003).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook on Transport and Development
EditorsRobin Hickman, Moshe Givoni, David Bonilla, David Banister
Place of PublicationCheltenham, UK
PublisherEdward Elgar Publishing
Chapter30
Pages459-475
ISBN (Electronic)9780857937261
ISBN (Print)9780857937254
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Netherlands
planning
land use
economic planning
transport network
regional planning
economic impact
social effects
physics
typology
nineteenth century
human being
interaction
school

Cite this

Geurs, K. T., & Halden, D. (2015). Accessibility: theory and practice in the Netherlands and UK. In R. Hickman, M. Givoni, D. Bonilla, & D. Banister (Eds.), Handbook on Transport and Development (pp. 459-475). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing. https://doi.org/10.4337/9780857937261.00037
Geurs, Karst Teunis ; Halden, Derek. / Accessibility: theory and practice in the Netherlands and UK. Handbook on Transport and Development. editor / Robin Hickman ; Moshe Givoni ; David Bonilla ; David Banister. Cheltenham, UK : Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015. pp. 459-475
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Geurs, KT & Halden, D 2015, Accessibility: theory and practice in the Netherlands and UK. in R Hickman, M Givoni, D Bonilla & D Banister (eds), Handbook on Transport and Development. Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK, pp. 459-475. https://doi.org/10.4337/9780857937261.00037

Accessibility: theory and practice in the Netherlands and UK. / Geurs, Karst Teunis; Halden, Derek.

Handbook on Transport and Development. ed. / Robin Hickman; Moshe Givoni; David Bonilla; David Banister. Cheltenham, UK : Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015. p. 459-475.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

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Geurs KT, Halden D. Accessibility: theory and practice in the Netherlands and UK. In Hickman R, Givoni M, Bonilla D, Banister D, editors, Handbook on Transport and Development. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing. 2015. p. 459-475 https://doi.org/10.4337/9780857937261.00037