Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI 2011)

C. Mühl, Antinus Nijholt, Brandan Allison, Stephen Dunne, Dirk K.J. Heylen

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

Recently, many groups (see Zander and Kothe. Towards passive brain–computer interfaces: applying brain–computer interface technology to human–machine systems in general. J. Neural Eng., 8, 2011) have worked toward expanding brain-computer interface (BCI) systems to include not only active control, but also passive mental state monitoring to enhance human computer interaction (HCI). Many studies have shown that brain imaging technologies can reveal information about the affective and cognitive state of a subject, and that the interaction between humans and machines can be aided by the recognition of those user states. New developments including practical sensors, new machine learning software, and improved interaction with the HCI community are leading us to systems that seamlessly integrate passively recorded information to improve interactions with the outside world. To achieve robust passive BCIs, efforts from applied and basic sciences have to be combined. On the one hand, applied fields such as affective computing aim to develop applications that adapt to changes in the user states and thereby enrich interaction, leading to a more natural and effective usability. On the other hand, basic research in neuroscience advances our understanding of the neural processes associated with emotions. Similar advancements are made for more cognitive mental states such as attention, workload, or fatigue.
Original languageUndefined
Title of host publicationProceedings 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII2011), Part II
EditorsSidney D' Mello, Arthur Graesser, Björn Schuller, Jean-Claude Martin
Place of PublicationBerlin
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages435
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)978-3-642-24570-1
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Oct 2011
Event4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ASCII 2011 - Memphis, United States

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Volume6975
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ASCII 2011
Abbreviated titleASCII
CountryUnited States
CityMemphis
Period9/10/1112/10/11

Fingerprint

Brain computer interface
Human computer interaction
Man machine systems
Interfaces (computer)
Learning systems
Brain
Fatigue of materials
Imaging techniques
Monitoring
Sensors

Keywords

  • METIS-279197
  • Mood
  • Affective Computing
  • Affective brain-computer interfacing
  • IR-78301
  • passive brain-computer interfacing
  • HMI-MI: MULTIMODAL INTERACTIONS
  • adaptive interfaces
  • Emotions
  • EWI-20671
  • mental state
  • user state
  • cognitive state estimation
  • EEG

Cite this

Mühl, C., Nijholt, A., Allison, B., Dunne, S., & Heylen, D. K. J. (2011). Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI 2011). In S. D' Mello, A. Graesser, B. Schuller, & J-C. Martin (Eds.), Proceedings 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII2011), Part II (pp. 435). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 6975). Berlin: Springer Verlag. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-24571-8_55

Mühl, C.; Nijholt, Antinus; Allison, Brandan; Dunne, Stephen; Heylen, Dirk K.J. / Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI 2011).

Proceedings 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII2011), Part II. ed. / Sidney D' Mello; Arthur Graesser; Björn Schuller; Jean-Claude Martin. Berlin : Springer Verlag, 2011. p. 435 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 6975).

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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Mühl, C, Nijholt, A, Allison, B, Dunne, S & Heylen, DKJ 2011, Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI 2011). in S D' Mello, A Graesser, B Schuller & J-C Martin (eds), Proceedings 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII2011), Part II. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 6975, Springer Verlag, Berlin, pp. 435, 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ASCII 2011, Memphis, United States, 9-12 October. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-24571-8_55

Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI 2011). / Mühl, C.; Nijholt, Antinus; Allison, Brandan; Dunne, Stephen; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

Proceedings 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII2011), Part II. ed. / Sidney D' Mello; Arthur Graesser; Björn Schuller; Jean-Claude Martin. Berlin : Springer Verlag, 2011. p. 435 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 6975).

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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Mühl C, Nijholt A, Allison B, Dunne S, Heylen DKJ. Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI 2011). In D' Mello S, Graesser A, Schuller B, Martin J-C, editors, Proceedings 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII2011), Part II. Berlin: Springer Verlag. 2011. p. 435. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science). Available from, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-24571-8_55