Affective conversational models: interpersonal stance in a police interview context

Merijn Bruijnes

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    320 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Building an affective conversational model for a virtual character that can play the role of suspect in a police interview training game comes with challenges. This paper focuses on the response modeling of interpersonal stance of a believable artificial conversational partner. Based on Leary’s interpersonal stance theory a computational of model interpersonal stance is created. Other psychological theories and ideas that are proposed to be integrated into the computational stance model are: face and politeness, rapport, and status or role. Proposed evaluation methods for the model use comparison of human behavior with model predicted behavior.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationHumaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2013
    Place of PublicationUSA
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society
    Pages624-629
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)978-0-7695-5048-0
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013
    Event5th Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2013 - Geneva, Switzerland
    Duration: 2 Sep 20135 Sep 2013
    Conference number: 5

    Publication series

    NameInternational Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction and Workshops
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society
    ISSN (Print)2156-8103

    Conference

    Conference5th Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2013
    Abbreviated titleACII
    CountrySwitzerland
    CityGeneva
    Period2/09/135/09/13

    Keywords

    • EWI-23682
    • METIS-300005
    • IR-87375
    • HMI-IA: Intelligent Agents

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