Air bubble in an ultrasound field: Theoretical and optical results

Peggy Palanchon, Ayache Bouakaz, Michel Versluis, Nico De Jong

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The radial motion of a gas bubble radius has been widely investigated in various studies using different theoretical models. The aim of this study was to qualitative and quantitative compare the results obtained with optical recording and a theoretical model. Methods: The bubble oscillations were optically recorded using the ultrafast digital camera, BRANDARIS. The radius-time R(t) curve are directly computed from 128 video frames with an unique temporal and spatial resolution. Air bubbles with a resting diameter ranging from 26 μm up to 100 μm were used. The ultrasound field was defined as a 8 cycles pulse at a frequency of 130 kHz generating an acoustic pressure between 10 kPa and 150 kPa. The time and the frequency response of the bubble radial motion were compared to the Keller model. Results: For low acoustic pressure levels, the amplitude of the bubble oscillations at the fundamental and second harmonic frequency is maximal for an air bubble with a resting radius of 24 μm, which corresponds to the theoretical resonance size. The comparison between the experimental and the simulated time and frequency responses of the bubble shows globally a good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively and for all the bubble sizes studied. The theoretical model correctly reproduced the nonlinear features of the bubble oscillations. The results showed that the second harmonic generation is maximal for resonant and half resonant bubbles. Bubbles above the resonance size require much higher acoustic pressure to oscillate nonlinearly. In addition, optical recordings showing an onset of the bubble shape also referred to surface mode oscillations, were also observed at pressure as low as 37 kPa. Conclusions: Keller model can be used to accurately predict the fundamental and harmonic behavior of gas bubbles.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberU1-C-3
Pages (from-to)210-213
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium
Volume1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2004
EventIEEE Ultrasonics Symposium 2004 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: 23 Aug 200427 Aug 2004

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bubbles
air
oscillations
frequency response
radii
acoustics
recording
harmonics
digital cameras
time response
temporal resolution
gases
harmonic generations
spatial resolution
cycles
curves

Cite this

Palanchon, Peggy ; Bouakaz, Ayache ; Versluis, Michel ; De Jong, Nico. / Air bubble in an ultrasound field : Theoretical and optical results. In: Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2004 ; Vol. 1. pp. 210-213.
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Air bubble in an ultrasound field : Theoretical and optical results. / Palanchon, Peggy; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; De Jong, Nico.

In: Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, Vol. 1, U1-C-3, 01.12.2004, p. 210-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleAcademicpeer-review

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N2 - Introduction: The radial motion of a gas bubble radius has been widely investigated in various studies using different theoretical models. The aim of this study was to qualitative and quantitative compare the results obtained with optical recording and a theoretical model. Methods: The bubble oscillations were optically recorded using the ultrafast digital camera, BRANDARIS. The radius-time R(t) curve are directly computed from 128 video frames with an unique temporal and spatial resolution. Air bubbles with a resting diameter ranging from 26 μm up to 100 μm were used. The ultrasound field was defined as a 8 cycles pulse at a frequency of 130 kHz generating an acoustic pressure between 10 kPa and 150 kPa. The time and the frequency response of the bubble radial motion were compared to the Keller model. Results: For low acoustic pressure levels, the amplitude of the bubble oscillations at the fundamental and second harmonic frequency is maximal for an air bubble with a resting radius of 24 μm, which corresponds to the theoretical resonance size. The comparison between the experimental and the simulated time and frequency responses of the bubble shows globally a good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively and for all the bubble sizes studied. The theoretical model correctly reproduced the nonlinear features of the bubble oscillations. The results showed that the second harmonic generation is maximal for resonant and half resonant bubbles. Bubbles above the resonance size require much higher acoustic pressure to oscillate nonlinearly. In addition, optical recordings showing an onset of the bubble shape also referred to surface mode oscillations, were also observed at pressure as low as 37 kPa. Conclusions: Keller model can be used to accurately predict the fundamental and harmonic behavior of gas bubbles.

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