Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data

Leandro Dantas De Santana, C. Schram, W. Desmet

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The noise emitted by incoming turbulence interacting with an airfoil has many technological applications, and has accordingly received much attention in the literature. While numerous developments are focused on the determination of the airfoil response to a given incoming gust, the characterization of the incoming turbulence seems to have received less attention. An important aspect thereto is the validity of the assumptions made to describe the incoming turbulence as isotropic and homogeneous. In this work, hot wire anemometry and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry are combined to obtain detailed measurements of the turbulence generated by either a grid or a rod, interacting with a NACA 0012 airfoil. A particular focus is placed on the measurement of the turbulence properties in the very close vicinity of the leading edge, in order to quantify turbulence distortion and compare the test data with Rapid Distortion Theory models. The experimental database permits to identify significant distortions of the mean velocity field, turbulence intensities, correlation lengths and turbulence spectra in a region with size comparable to the airfoil leading-edge radius of curvature. It is demonstrated that even in cases where the flow is nearly homogeneous in the spanwise direction, small variations must be taken into account to improve the sound predictions. But the most significant effect to include in the prediction is the distortion of the incoming turbulence spectrum, here modeled using Rapid Distortion Theory, if a meaningful sound prediction is to be obtained.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown
Place of PublicationDalles, USA
Pages-
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2015
Event21st AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference 2015: held during the 2015 AIAA Aviation Forum - Dallas, United States
Duration: 22 Jun 201526 Jun 2015
Conference number: 21

Conference

Conference21st AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference 2015
CountryUnited States
CityDallas
Period22/06/1526/06/15

Fingerprint

noise prediction
airfoils
particle image velocimetry
turbulence
leading edges
predictions
gusts
acoustics
velocity measurement
rods
velocity distribution
grids
curvature
wire
radii

Keywords

  • IR-99148
  • METIS-315350

Cite this

De Santana, L. D., Schram, C., & Desmet, W. (2015). Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data. In Unknown (pp. -). Dalles, USA. https://doi.org/10.2514/6.2015-2203
De Santana, Leandro Dantas ; Schram, C. ; Desmet, W. / Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data. Unknown. Dalles, USA, 2015. pp. -
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abstract = "The noise emitted by incoming turbulence interacting with an airfoil has many technological applications, and has accordingly received much attention in the literature. While numerous developments are focused on the determination of the airfoil response to a given incoming gust, the characterization of the incoming turbulence seems to have received less attention. An important aspect thereto is the validity of the assumptions made to describe the incoming turbulence as isotropic and homogeneous. In this work, hot wire anemometry and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry are combined to obtain detailed measurements of the turbulence generated by either a grid or a rod, interacting with a NACA 0012 airfoil. A particular focus is placed on the measurement of the turbulence properties in the very close vicinity of the leading edge, in order to quantify turbulence distortion and compare the test data with Rapid Distortion Theory models. The experimental database permits to identify significant distortions of the mean velocity field, turbulence intensities, correlation lengths and turbulence spectra in a region with size comparable to the airfoil leading-edge radius of curvature. It is demonstrated that even in cases where the flow is nearly homogeneous in the spanwise direction, small variations must be taken into account to improve the sound predictions. But the most significant effect to include in the prediction is the distortion of the incoming turbulence spectrum, here modeled using Rapid Distortion Theory, if a meaningful sound prediction is to be obtained.",
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De Santana, LD, Schram, C & Desmet, W 2015, Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data. in Unknown. Dalles, USA, pp. -, 21st AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference 2015, Dallas, United States, 22/06/15. https://doi.org/10.2514/6.2015-2203

Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data. / De Santana, Leandro Dantas; Schram, C.; Desmet, W.

Unknown. Dalles, USA, 2015. p. -.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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N2 - The noise emitted by incoming turbulence interacting with an airfoil has many technological applications, and has accordingly received much attention in the literature. While numerous developments are focused on the determination of the airfoil response to a given incoming gust, the characterization of the incoming turbulence seems to have received less attention. An important aspect thereto is the validity of the assumptions made to describe the incoming turbulence as isotropic and homogeneous. In this work, hot wire anemometry and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry are combined to obtain detailed measurements of the turbulence generated by either a grid or a rod, interacting with a NACA 0012 airfoil. A particular focus is placed on the measurement of the turbulence properties in the very close vicinity of the leading edge, in order to quantify turbulence distortion and compare the test data with Rapid Distortion Theory models. The experimental database permits to identify significant distortions of the mean velocity field, turbulence intensities, correlation lengths and turbulence spectra in a region with size comparable to the airfoil leading-edge radius of curvature. It is demonstrated that even in cases where the flow is nearly homogeneous in the spanwise direction, small variations must be taken into account to improve the sound predictions. But the most significant effect to include in the prediction is the distortion of the incoming turbulence spectrum, here modeled using Rapid Distortion Theory, if a meaningful sound prediction is to be obtained.

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