Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer

Willem Grootjans, Lioe-Fee de Geus-Oei, Antoi P.W. Meeuwis, Charlotte S. van der Vos, Martin Gotthardt, Wim J.G. Oyen, Eric P. Visser

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Abstract

Objectives Respiratory motion during PET imaging introduces quantitative and diagnostic inaccuracies, which may result in non-optimal patient management. This study investigated the effects of respiratory gating on image quantification using an amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating (ORG) algorithm. Methods Whole body FDG-PET/CT was performed in 66 lung cancer patients. The respiratory signal was obtained using a pressure sensor integrated in an elastic belt placed around the patient’s thorax. ORG images were reconstructed with 50 %, 35 %, and 20 % of acquired PET data (duty cycle). Lesions were grouped into anatomical locations. Differences in lesion volume between ORG and non-gated images, and mean FDG-uptake (SUVmean) were calculated. Results Lesions in the middle and lower lobes demonstrated a significant SUVmean increase for all duty cycles and volume decrease for duty cycles of 35 % and 20 %. Significant increase in SUVmean and decrease in volume for lesions in the upper lobes were observed for a 20 % duty cycle. The SUVmean increase for central lesions was significant for all duty cycles, whereas a significant volume decrease was observed for a duty cycle of 20 %. Conclusions This study implies that ORG could influence clinical PET imaging with respect to response monitoring and radiotherapy planning.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3242-3250
JournalEuropean radiology
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Positron-Emission Tomography
Lung Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Thorax
Pressure

Keywords

  • METIS-310192
  • IR-95454

Cite this

Grootjans, W., de Geus-Oei, L-F., Meeuwis, A. P. W., van der Vos, C. S., Gotthardt, M., Oyen, W. J. G., & Visser, E. P. (2014). Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer. European radiology, 24(12), 3242-3250. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-014-3362-z
Grootjans, Willem ; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee ; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W. ; van der Vos, Charlotte S. ; Gotthardt, Martin ; Oyen, Wim J.G. ; Visser, Eric P. / Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer. In: European radiology. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 12. pp. 3242-3250.
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title = "Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer",
abstract = "Objectives Respiratory motion during PET imaging introduces quantitative and diagnostic inaccuracies, which may result in non-optimal patient management. This study investigated the effects of respiratory gating on image quantification using an amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating (ORG) algorithm. Methods Whole body FDG-PET/CT was performed in 66 lung cancer patients. The respiratory signal was obtained using a pressure sensor integrated in an elastic belt placed around the patient’s thorax. ORG images were reconstructed with 50 {\%}, 35 {\%}, and 20 {\%} of acquired PET data (duty cycle). Lesions were grouped into anatomical locations. Differences in lesion volume between ORG and non-gated images, and mean FDG-uptake (SUVmean) were calculated. Results Lesions in the middle and lower lobes demonstrated a significant SUVmean increase for all duty cycles and volume decrease for duty cycles of 35 {\%} and 20 {\%}. Significant increase in SUVmean and decrease in volume for lesions in the upper lobes were observed for a 20 {\%} duty cycle. The SUVmean increase for central lesions was significant for all duty cycles, whereas a significant volume decrease was observed for a duty cycle of 20 {\%}. Conclusions This study implies that ORG could influence clinical PET imaging with respect to response monitoring and radiotherapy planning.",
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Grootjans, W, de Geus-Oei, L-F, Meeuwis, APW, van der Vos, CS, Gotthardt, M, Oyen, WJG & Visser, EP 2014, 'Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer', European radiology, vol. 24, no. 12, pp. 3242-3250. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-014-3362-z

Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer. / Grootjans, Willem; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; van der Vos, Charlotte S.; Gotthardt, Martin; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Visser, Eric P.

In: European radiology, Vol. 24, No. 12, 2014, p. 3242-3250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer

AU - Grootjans, Willem

AU - de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

AU - Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.

AU - van der Vos, Charlotte S.

AU - Gotthardt, Martin

AU - Oyen, Wim J.G.

AU - Visser, Eric P.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objectives Respiratory motion during PET imaging introduces quantitative and diagnostic inaccuracies, which may result in non-optimal patient management. This study investigated the effects of respiratory gating on image quantification using an amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating (ORG) algorithm. Methods Whole body FDG-PET/CT was performed in 66 lung cancer patients. The respiratory signal was obtained using a pressure sensor integrated in an elastic belt placed around the patient’s thorax. ORG images were reconstructed with 50 %, 35 %, and 20 % of acquired PET data (duty cycle). Lesions were grouped into anatomical locations. Differences in lesion volume between ORG and non-gated images, and mean FDG-uptake (SUVmean) were calculated. Results Lesions in the middle and lower lobes demonstrated a significant SUVmean increase for all duty cycles and volume decrease for duty cycles of 35 % and 20 %. Significant increase in SUVmean and decrease in volume for lesions in the upper lobes were observed for a 20 % duty cycle. The SUVmean increase for central lesions was significant for all duty cycles, whereas a significant volume decrease was observed for a duty cycle of 20 %. Conclusions This study implies that ORG could influence clinical PET imaging with respect to response monitoring and radiotherapy planning.

AB - Objectives Respiratory motion during PET imaging introduces quantitative and diagnostic inaccuracies, which may result in non-optimal patient management. This study investigated the effects of respiratory gating on image quantification using an amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating (ORG) algorithm. Methods Whole body FDG-PET/CT was performed in 66 lung cancer patients. The respiratory signal was obtained using a pressure sensor integrated in an elastic belt placed around the patient’s thorax. ORG images were reconstructed with 50 %, 35 %, and 20 % of acquired PET data (duty cycle). Lesions were grouped into anatomical locations. Differences in lesion volume between ORG and non-gated images, and mean FDG-uptake (SUVmean) were calculated. Results Lesions in the middle and lower lobes demonstrated a significant SUVmean increase for all duty cycles and volume decrease for duty cycles of 35 % and 20 %. Significant increase in SUVmean and decrease in volume for lesions in the upper lobes were observed for a 20 % duty cycle. The SUVmean increase for central lesions was significant for all duty cycles, whereas a significant volume decrease was observed for a duty cycle of 20 %. Conclusions This study implies that ORG could influence clinical PET imaging with respect to response monitoring and radiotherapy planning.

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M3 - Article

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SP - 3242

EP - 3250

JO - European radiology

JF - European radiology

SN - 0938-7994

IS - 12

ER -