An Application-Tailored MAC Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

Supriyo Chatterjea, L.F.W. van Hoesel, Paul J.M. Havinga

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    Abstract

    We describe a data management framework suitable for wireless sensor networks that can be used to adapt the performance of a medium access control (MAC) protocol depending on the query injected into the network. The framework has a completely distributed architecture and only makes use of information available locally to capture information about network traffic patterns. It allows nodes not servicing a query to enter a dormant mode which minimizes transmissions and yet maintain an updated view of the network. We then introduce an Adaptive, Information-centric and Lightweight MAC (AI-LMAC) protocol that adapts its operation depending on the information presented by the framework. Our results demonstrate how transmissions are greatly reduced during the dormant mode. During the active mode, the MAC protocol adjusts fairness to match the expected requirements of the query thus reducing latency. Thus such a data management framework allows the MAC to operate more efficiently by tailoring its needs to suit the requirements of the application.
    Original languageUndefined
    Title of host publicationInternational Workshop on Wireless Ad-hoc Networks 2005 (IWWAN 2005)
    Place of PublicationLondon
    PublisherCentre for Telecommunications research King's College
    Pages35-41
    Number of pages35
    ISBN (Print)not assigned
    Publication statusPublished - May 2005

    Keywords

    • Wireless Sensor Networks
    • EWI-13328
    • IR-59886
    • METIS-229211
    • CAES-PS: Pervasive Systems

    Cite this

    Chatterjea, S., van Hoesel, L. F. W., & Havinga, P. J. M. (2005). An Application-Tailored MAC Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks. In International Workshop on Wireless Ad-hoc Networks 2005 (IWWAN 2005) (pp. 35-41). London: Centre for Telecommunications research King's College.