Antennas for light and plasmons

D.J.W. Dikken

Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

Abstract

Antennas have been used for over a century as emitters, scatterers and receivers of electromagnetic waves. All wireless communication devices, such as radio, mobile phones and satellite communication are strongly dependent on the capability of an antenna to localize propagating electromagnetic waves to a fraction of its wavelength. Because Maxwell's equations are scale-invariant the principles of antenna designs at radio frequencies (106 Hz) can also be applied at optical frequencies (1014 Hz) [1]. Over the course of the last two decades, novel developments in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of antennas in the optical regime, and various optical antenna structures have been developed that have the potential to advance many light based technologies [2-5]. The power of optical antennas lies in their capability to manipulate light at the nanoscale. This freedom of controlling light at the nanoscale enables the creation of novel field distributions, where light can be focused to a fraction of the wavelength. Controlling the polarization state of these sub-wavelength spots is of interest for many future applications, including quantum computing. In this thesis the far- and near-fields of optical antennas are experimentally and numerically studied. We determine and manipulate several parameters which determine the resonance behavior of single and coupled antenna systems. With a newly developed optical technique, we are able to measure and manipulate the optical state of the near- and far-field of an array of optical antennas. With this technique we can make a phased antenna array for light, and manipulate the optical state of light at the nanoscale. We experimentally demonstrate how the fundamental properties of light at any point in space have become programmable parameters.
LanguageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • University of Twente
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Herek, Jennifer Lynn, Supervisor
Award date30 Sep 2015
Place of PublicationEnschede
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-90-365-3953-1
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Sep 2015

Fingerprint

plasmons
antennas
far fields
near fields
electromagnetic radiation
wavelengths
satellite communication
antenna design
theses
antenna arrays
wireless communication
phased arrays
quantum computation
nanotechnology
Maxwell equation
radio frequencies
emitters
receivers
communication
fabrication

Keywords

  • METIS-311712
  • IR-97173

Cite this

Dikken, D. J. W. (2015). Antennas for light and plasmons Enschede: Universiteit Twente DOI: 10.3990/1.9789036539531
Dikken, D.J.W.. / Antennas for light and plasmons. Enschede : Universiteit Twente, 2015. 170 p.
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abstract = "Antennas have been used for over a century as emitters, scatterers and receivers of electromagnetic waves. All wireless communication devices, such as radio, mobile phones and satellite communication are strongly dependent on the capability of an antenna to localize propagating electromagnetic waves to a fraction of its wavelength. Because Maxwell's equations are scale-invariant the principles of antenna designs at radio frequencies (106 Hz) can also be applied at optical frequencies (1014 Hz) [1]. Over the course of the last two decades, novel developments in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of antennas in the optical regime, and various optical antenna structures have been developed that have the potential to advance many light based technologies [2-5]. The power of optical antennas lies in their capability to manipulate light at the nanoscale. This freedom of controlling light at the nanoscale enables the creation of novel field distributions, where light can be focused to a fraction of the wavelength. Controlling the polarization state of these sub-wavelength spots is of interest for many future applications, including quantum computing. In this thesis the far- and near-fields of optical antennas are experimentally and numerically studied. We determine and manipulate several parameters which determine the resonance behavior of single and coupled antenna systems. With a newly developed optical technique, we are able to measure and manipulate the optical state of the near- and far-field of an array of optical antennas. With this technique we can make a phased antenna array for light, and manipulate the optical state of light at the nanoscale. We experimentally demonstrate how the fundamental properties of light at any point in space have become programmable parameters.",
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Dikken, DJW 2015, 'Antennas for light and plasmons', University of Twente, Enschede. DOI: 10.3990/1.9789036539531

Antennas for light and plasmons. / Dikken, D.J.W.

Enschede : Universiteit Twente, 2015. 170 p.

Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

TY - THES

T1 - Antennas for light and plasmons

AU - Dikken,D.J.W.

PY - 2015/9/30

Y1 - 2015/9/30

N2 - Antennas have been used for over a century as emitters, scatterers and receivers of electromagnetic waves. All wireless communication devices, such as radio, mobile phones and satellite communication are strongly dependent on the capability of an antenna to localize propagating electromagnetic waves to a fraction of its wavelength. Because Maxwell's equations are scale-invariant the principles of antenna designs at radio frequencies (106 Hz) can also be applied at optical frequencies (1014 Hz) [1]. Over the course of the last two decades, novel developments in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of antennas in the optical regime, and various optical antenna structures have been developed that have the potential to advance many light based technologies [2-5]. The power of optical antennas lies in their capability to manipulate light at the nanoscale. This freedom of controlling light at the nanoscale enables the creation of novel field distributions, where light can be focused to a fraction of the wavelength. Controlling the polarization state of these sub-wavelength spots is of interest for many future applications, including quantum computing. In this thesis the far- and near-fields of optical antennas are experimentally and numerically studied. We determine and manipulate several parameters which determine the resonance behavior of single and coupled antenna systems. With a newly developed optical technique, we are able to measure and manipulate the optical state of the near- and far-field of an array of optical antennas. With this technique we can make a phased antenna array for light, and manipulate the optical state of light at the nanoscale. We experimentally demonstrate how the fundamental properties of light at any point in space have become programmable parameters.

AB - Antennas have been used for over a century as emitters, scatterers and receivers of electromagnetic waves. All wireless communication devices, such as radio, mobile phones and satellite communication are strongly dependent on the capability of an antenna to localize propagating electromagnetic waves to a fraction of its wavelength. Because Maxwell's equations are scale-invariant the principles of antenna designs at radio frequencies (106 Hz) can also be applied at optical frequencies (1014 Hz) [1]. Over the course of the last two decades, novel developments in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of antennas in the optical regime, and various optical antenna structures have been developed that have the potential to advance many light based technologies [2-5]. The power of optical antennas lies in their capability to manipulate light at the nanoscale. This freedom of controlling light at the nanoscale enables the creation of novel field distributions, where light can be focused to a fraction of the wavelength. Controlling the polarization state of these sub-wavelength spots is of interest for many future applications, including quantum computing. In this thesis the far- and near-fields of optical antennas are experimentally and numerically studied. We determine and manipulate several parameters which determine the resonance behavior of single and coupled antenna systems. With a newly developed optical technique, we are able to measure and manipulate the optical state of the near- and far-field of an array of optical antennas. With this technique we can make a phased antenna array for light, and manipulate the optical state of light at the nanoscale. We experimentally demonstrate how the fundamental properties of light at any point in space have become programmable parameters.

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KW - IR-97173

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M3 - PhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

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Dikken DJW. Antennas for light and plasmons. Enschede: Universiteit Twente, 2015. 170 p. Available from, DOI: 10.3990/1.9789036539531