Are users more diverse than designs? Testing and extending a 25 years old claim

Martin Schmettow, J. Havinga

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
81 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Twenty-five years ago, Dennis Egan published a review on the impact of individual differences in human-computer interaction, where he claimed that users are more diverse than designs are [5]. While being cited frequently, this claim has not been tested since then. An efficient research design for separating and comparing variance components is presented, together with a statistical model to test Egan’s claim. The results of a pilot study indicate that Egan’s claim does not universally hold. An extension to the claim is suggested, capturing the trade-offs when prioritizing user tasks. An alternative strategy towards universal design is proposed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHCI 2013 : The 27th International British Computer Society Human Computer Interaction Conference: The Internet of things; held in London, 9-13 September 2013
EditorsC. Bowers, B. Cowan
Place of PublicationUxbridge, UK
PublisherBSC Learning and Development Ltd.
Pages-
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event27th International BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, HCI 2013: The Internet of things - Brunel University, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 9 Sep 201313 Sep 2013
Conference number: 27

Publication series

Name
PublisherBSC Learning and Development Ltd.

Conference

Conference27th International BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, HCI 2013
Abbreviated titleHCI
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period9/09/1313/09/13

Keywords

  • METIS-297857
  • IR-87274

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