Are You Still There? - A Lightweight Algorithm to Monitor Node Presence in Self-Configuring Networks

Henrik Bohnenkamp, Johan Gorter, Jarno Guidi, Joost-Pieter Katoen

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)
    5 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This paper is concerned with the analysis and redesign of a distributed algorithm to monitor the availability of nodes in self-configuring networks. The simple scheme to regularly probe a node — "are you still there?" — may easily lead to over- or underloading. The essence of the algorithm is therefore to automatically adapt the probing frequency. We show that a self-adaptive scheme to control the probe load, originally proposed as an extension to the UPnPTM (Universal Plug and Play) standard, leads to an unfair treatment of nodes: some nodes probe fast while others almost starve. An alternative distributed algorithm is proposed that overcomes this problem and that tolerates highly dynamic network topology changes. The algorithm is very simple and can be implemented on large networks of small computing devices such as mobile phones, PDAs, and so on.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication2005 International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN'05)
    Place of PublicationLos Alamitos, CA
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society
    Pages704-709
    Number of pages7
    ISBN (Print)0-7695-2282-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    EventInternational Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks, DSN 2005 - Yokohama, Japan
    Duration: 28 Jun 20051 Jul 2005

    Conference

    ConferenceInternational Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks, DSN 2005
    Abbreviated titleDSN
    CountryJapan
    CityYokohama
    Period28/06/051/07/05

    Keywords

    • EWI-1541
    • IR-54790
    • METIS-229279

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