Assessing storm erosion hazards

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    The storm erosion hazard on coasts is usually expressed as an erosion volume and/or associated episodic coastline retreat. The accurate assessment of present-day and future storm erosion volumes is a key task for coastal zone managers, planners and engineers. There are four main approaches that can be used to assess storm erosion volumes for coastal management/planning purposes. These approaches include: extrapolated wave exceedance characteristics (EWEC) approach, synthetic design storm (SDS) approach; Corbella and Stretch (CS) approach; and the joint probability method (JPM) approach. The EWEC and SDS approaches can only return a single deterministic estimate of storm erosion volume associated with a design storm wave height. However, in situations where a hazard assessment study is hindered by budgetary, computational or modelling skill constraints, these approaches may still be used to support coastal management/planning strategies if the user is acutely aware of the caveats associated with thus calculated storm erosion volume estimates.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationCoastal storms: processes and impacts
    EditorsPaolo Ciavola, Giovanni Coco
    PublisherWiley
    Pages241-256
    ISBN (Electronic)9781118937099
    ISBN (Print)9781118937105
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Apr 2017

    Fingerprint

    hazard
    erosion
    coastal zone management
    coast
    wave height
    hazard assessment
    coastal zone
    modeling
    planning

    Keywords

    • METIS-320529

    Cite this

    Ranasinghe, R. W. M. R. J. B., & Callaghan, D. (2017). Assessing storm erosion hazards. In P. Ciavola, & G. Coco (Eds.), Coastal storms: processes and impacts (pp. 241-256). Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118937099.ch12
    Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe W M R J B ; Callaghan, D. / Assessing storm erosion hazards. Coastal storms: processes and impacts. editor / Paolo Ciavola ; Giovanni Coco. Wiley, 2017. pp. 241-256
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    Ranasinghe, RWMRJB & Callaghan, D 2017, Assessing storm erosion hazards. in P Ciavola & G Coco (eds), Coastal storms: processes and impacts. Wiley, pp. 241-256. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118937099.ch12

    Assessing storm erosion hazards. / Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe W M R J B; Callaghan, D.

    Coastal storms: processes and impacts. ed. / Paolo Ciavola; Giovanni Coco. Wiley, 2017. p. 241-256.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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    T1 - Assessing storm erosion hazards

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    AB - The storm erosion hazard on coasts is usually expressed as an erosion volume and/or associated episodic coastline retreat. The accurate assessment of present-day and future storm erosion volumes is a key task for coastal zone managers, planners and engineers. There are four main approaches that can be used to assess storm erosion volumes for coastal management/planning purposes. These approaches include: extrapolated wave exceedance characteristics (EWEC) approach, synthetic design storm (SDS) approach; Corbella and Stretch (CS) approach; and the joint probability method (JPM) approach. The EWEC and SDS approaches can only return a single deterministic estimate of storm erosion volume associated with a design storm wave height. However, in situations where a hazard assessment study is hindered by budgetary, computational or modelling skill constraints, these approaches may still be used to support coastal management/planning strategies if the user is acutely aware of the caveats associated with thus calculated storm erosion volume estimates.

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    M3 - Chapter

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    SP - 241

    EP - 256

    BT - Coastal storms: processes and impacts

    A2 - Ciavola, Paolo

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    Ranasinghe RWMRJB, Callaghan D. Assessing storm erosion hazards. In Ciavola P, Coco G, editors, Coastal storms: processes and impacts. Wiley. 2017. p. 241-256 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118937099.ch12