Associations between perceived employability, employee well-being, and its contributions to organizational success: A matter of psychological contracts?

Nele de Cuyper, Beatrice I.J.M. van der Heijden, Hans De Witte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated interactions between perceived employability and employees' perceptions about psychological contract obligations made by the employer in relation to life and job satisfaction, self-rated performance, and turnover intention. We hypothesized that perceived employability relates positively to job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and self-rated performance and negatively to turnover intention under the condition of many promises. Conversely, perceived employability relates negatively to job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and self-rated performance and positively to turnover intention under the condition of few promises. Analyses using a sample of 463 workers from seven Belgian organizations showed that perceived employability was positively related to all outcomes except job satisfaction. The number of promises was positively related to job and life satisfaction, and to self-rated performance, and negatively to turnover intention. Contradictory to our expectations, with the exception of turnover intention, the relationships between perceived employability and the outcomes were relatively stronger and positive under the condition of few promises compared with many promises.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1486-1503
JournalInternational journal of human resource management
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Employability
  • Well being
  • organizational outcomes
  • psychological contract
  • METIS-279772
  • IR-83020

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