Avoiding or mitigating flooding: Bottom-up drivers of urban resilience to climate change in the USA

Koen de Koning, Tatiana Filatova, Ariana Need, Okmyung Bin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Coastal areas around the world are urbanizing rapidly, despite the threat of sea level rise and intensifying floods. Such development places an increasing number of people and capital at risk, which calls for public flood management as well as household level adaptation measures that reduce social vulnerability to flooding and climate change. This study explores several private adaptation responses to flood risk, that are driven by various behavioral triggers. We conduct a survey among households in hazard-prone areas in eight coastal states in the USA, of which, some have recently experienced major flooding. While numerous empirical studies have investigated household-level flood damage mitigation, little attention has been given to examining the decision to retreat from flood zones. We examine what behavioral motives drive the choices for flood damage mitigation and relocation separately among property buyers and sellers. Hence, we focus on the drivers that shape demand for future development in flood-prone cities. We find that households’ choices to retreat from or to avoid flood zones (1) are highly sensitive to information that provokes people's feelings of fear, and (2) rely on hazardous events to trigger a protective action, which ideally would take place well before these events occur. We highlight that major flooding may cause a potential risk of large-scale outmigration and demographic changes in flood-prone areas, putting more low-income households at risk. Therefore, coordinated policies that integrate bottom-up drivers of individual climate adaptation are needed to increase urban resilience to floods.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101981
JournalGlobal environmental change
Volume59
Early online date24 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

Fingerprint

resilience
natural disaster
climate change
flooding
driver
flood damage
mitigation
damages
household survey
household income
coastal state
relocation
event
move
vulnerability
population development
low income
climate
threat
anxiety

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D
  • coastal flooding
  • flood adaptation
  • housing market
  • retreat
  • surveys
  • Bayesian statistics

Cite this

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title = "Avoiding or mitigating flooding: Bottom-up drivers of urban resilience to climate change in the USA",
abstract = "Coastal areas around the world are urbanizing rapidly, despite the threat of sea level rise and intensifying floods. Such development places an increasing number of people and capital at risk, which calls for public flood management as well as household level adaptation measures that reduce social vulnerability to flooding and climate change. This study explores several private adaptation responses to flood risk, that are driven by various behavioral triggers. We conduct a survey among households in hazard-prone areas in eight coastal states in the USA, of which, some have recently experienced major flooding. While numerous empirical studies have investigated household-level flood damage mitigation, little attention has been given to examining the decision to retreat from flood zones. We examine what behavioral motives drive the choices for flood damage mitigation and relocation separately among property buyers and sellers. Hence, we focus on the drivers that shape demand for future development in flood-prone cities. We find that households’ choices to retreat from or to avoid flood zones (1) are highly sensitive to information that provokes people's feelings of fear, and (2) rely on hazardous events to trigger a protective action, which ideally would take place well before these events occur. We highlight that major flooding may cause a potential risk of large-scale outmigration and demographic changes in flood-prone areas, putting more low-income households at risk. Therefore, coordinated policies that integrate bottom-up drivers of individual climate adaptation are needed to increase urban resilience to floods.",
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Avoiding or mitigating flooding : Bottom-up drivers of urban resilience to climate change in the USA. / de Koning, Koen; Filatova, Tatiana; Need, Ariana; Bin, Okmyung.

In: Global environmental change, Vol. 59, 101981, 01.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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