Abstract

Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI) has found applications for disabled users. Progress in BCI research allows looking at applications for ‘abled’ users. For these applications users have other demands, and they will be critical about devices that limit physical movements and that require long periods of training. Prototype BCI applications now appear in the domain of games and entertainment that aim at adapting and controlling a game using brain signals in addition to traditional physical and mental abilities.
Original languageUndefined
Title of host publication7th International Conference on Entertainment Computing (ICEC)
EditorsS.M. Stevens, S. Saldamarco
Place of PublicationBerlin
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages225-228
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)978-3-540-89221-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Volume5309

Fingerprint

Brain
Computer applications

Keywords

  • EWI-13266
  • IR-62430
  • METIS-263687
  • HMI-MI: MULTIMODAL INTERACTIONS

Cite this

Nijholt, A. (2009). BCI for Games: A 'State of the Art' Survey. In S. M. Stevens, & S. Saldamarco (Eds.), 7th International Conference on Entertainment Computing (ICEC) (pp. 225-228). [10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29] (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 5309). Berlin: Springer Verlag. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29

Nijholt, Antinus / BCI for Games: A 'State of the Art' Survey.

7th International Conference on Entertainment Computing (ICEC). ed. / S.M. Stevens; S. Saldamarco. Berlin : Springer Verlag, 2009. p. 225-228 10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 5309).

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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abstract = "Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI) has found applications for disabled users. Progress in BCI research allows looking at applications for ‘abled’ users. For these applications users have other demands, and they will be critical about devices that limit physical movements and that require long periods of training. Prototype BCI applications now appear in the domain of games and entertainment that aim at adapting and controlling a game using brain signals in addition to traditional physical and mental abilities.",
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Nijholt, A 2009, BCI for Games: A 'State of the Art' Survey. in SM Stevens & S Saldamarco (eds), 7th International Conference on Entertainment Computing (ICEC)., 10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 5309, Springer Verlag, Berlin, pp. 225-228. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29

BCI for Games: A 'State of the Art' Survey. / Nijholt, Antinus.

7th International Conference on Entertainment Computing (ICEC). ed. / S.M. Stevens; S. Saldamarco. Berlin : Springer Verlag, 2009. p. 225-228 10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 5309).

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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Nijholt A. BCI for Games: A 'State of the Art' Survey. In Stevens SM, Saldamarco S, editors, 7th International Conference on Entertainment Computing (ICEC). Berlin: Springer Verlag. 2009. p. 225-228. 10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science). Available from, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-89222-9_29