Biological and Tribological Assessment of Poly(Ethylene Oxide Terephthalate)/Poly(Butylene Terephthalate), Polycaprolactone, and Poly (L\DL) Lactic Acid Plotted Scaffolds for Skeletal Tissue Regeneration

W.J. Hendrikson, Xiangqiong Zeng, Jeroen Rouwkema, Clemens van Blitterswijk, Emile van der Heide, Lorenzo Moroni

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1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Additive manufactured scaffolds are fabricated from three commonly used biomaterials, polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (L\DL) lactic acid (P(L\DL)LA), and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT). Scaffolds are compared biologically and tribologically. Cell-seeded PEOT/PBT scaffolds cultured in osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation media show statistical significantly higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAG)/DNA ratios, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA scaffolds, respectively. The tribological performance is assessed by determining the friction coefficients of the scaffolds at different loads and sliding velocities. With increasing load or decreasing sliding velocity, the friction coefficient value decreases. PEOT/PBT show to have the lowest friction coefficient value, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA. The influence of the scaffold architecture is further determined with PEOT/PBT. Reducing of the fiber spacing results in a lower friction coefficient value. The best and the worst performing scaffold architecture are chosen to investigate the effect of cell culture on the friction coefficient. Matrix deposition is low in the cell-seeded scaffolds and the effect is, therefore, undetermined. Taken together, our studies show that PEOT/PBT scaffolds support better skeletal differentiation of seeded stromal cells and lower friction coefficient compared to PCL and P(L/DL)A scaffolds.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)232-243
JournalAdvanced healthcare materials
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Tissue Scaffolds
Ethylene Oxide
Tissue regeneration
Polycaprolactone
Lactic acid
Polyethylene oxides
Scaffolds
Regeneration
Lactic Acid
Friction
DNA
terephthalic acid
butylene
polycaprolactone
poly(lactic acid)
Phosphatases
Biocompatible Materials
Stromal Cells
Glycosaminoglycans
Cell culture

Keywords

  • METIS-314051
  • IR-99859

Cite this

@article{c5bb1ad3d8ed45949cb8d02d58f2593c,
title = "Biological and Tribological Assessment of Poly(Ethylene Oxide Terephthalate)/Poly(Butylene Terephthalate), Polycaprolactone, and Poly (L\DL) Lactic Acid Plotted Scaffolds for Skeletal Tissue Regeneration",
abstract = "Additive manufactured scaffolds are fabricated from three commonly used biomaterials, polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (L\DL) lactic acid (P(L\DL)LA), and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT). Scaffolds are compared biologically and tribologically. Cell-seeded PEOT/PBT scaffolds cultured in osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation media show statistical significantly higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAG)/DNA ratios, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA scaffolds, respectively. The tribological performance is assessed by determining the friction coefficients of the scaffolds at different loads and sliding velocities. With increasing load or decreasing sliding velocity, the friction coefficient value decreases. PEOT/PBT show to have the lowest friction coefficient value, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA. The influence of the scaffold architecture is further determined with PEOT/PBT. Reducing of the fiber spacing results in a lower friction coefficient value. The best and the worst performing scaffold architecture are chosen to investigate the effect of cell culture on the friction coefficient. Matrix deposition is low in the cell-seeded scaffolds and the effect is, therefore, undetermined. Taken together, our studies show that PEOT/PBT scaffolds support better skeletal differentiation of seeded stromal cells and lower friction coefficient compared to PCL and P(L/DL)A scaffolds.",
keywords = "METIS-314051, IR-99859",
author = "W.J. Hendrikson and Xiangqiong Zeng and Jeroen Rouwkema and {van Blitterswijk}, Clemens and {van der Heide}, Emile and Lorenzo Moroni",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1002/adhm.201500067",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "232--243",
journal = "Advanced healthcare materials",
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}

Biological and Tribological Assessment of Poly(Ethylene Oxide Terephthalate)/Poly(Butylene Terephthalate), Polycaprolactone, and Poly (L\DL) Lactic Acid Plotted Scaffolds for Skeletal Tissue Regeneration. / Hendrikson, W.J.; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Rouwkema, Jeroen; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; van der Heide, Emile; Moroni, Lorenzo.

In: Advanced healthcare materials, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2016, p. 232-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biological and Tribological Assessment of Poly(Ethylene Oxide Terephthalate)/Poly(Butylene Terephthalate), Polycaprolactone, and Poly (L\DL) Lactic Acid Plotted Scaffolds for Skeletal Tissue Regeneration

AU - Hendrikson, W.J.

AU - Zeng, Xiangqiong

AU - Rouwkema, Jeroen

AU - van Blitterswijk, Clemens

AU - van der Heide, Emile

AU - Moroni, Lorenzo

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Additive manufactured scaffolds are fabricated from three commonly used biomaterials, polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (L\DL) lactic acid (P(L\DL)LA), and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT). Scaffolds are compared biologically and tribologically. Cell-seeded PEOT/PBT scaffolds cultured in osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation media show statistical significantly higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAG)/DNA ratios, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA scaffolds, respectively. The tribological performance is assessed by determining the friction coefficients of the scaffolds at different loads and sliding velocities. With increasing load or decreasing sliding velocity, the friction coefficient value decreases. PEOT/PBT show to have the lowest friction coefficient value, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA. The influence of the scaffold architecture is further determined with PEOT/PBT. Reducing of the fiber spacing results in a lower friction coefficient value. The best and the worst performing scaffold architecture are chosen to investigate the effect of cell culture on the friction coefficient. Matrix deposition is low in the cell-seeded scaffolds and the effect is, therefore, undetermined. Taken together, our studies show that PEOT/PBT scaffolds support better skeletal differentiation of seeded stromal cells and lower friction coefficient compared to PCL and P(L/DL)A scaffolds.

AB - Additive manufactured scaffolds are fabricated from three commonly used biomaterials, polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (L\DL) lactic acid (P(L\DL)LA), and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT). Scaffolds are compared biologically and tribologically. Cell-seeded PEOT/PBT scaffolds cultured in osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation media show statistical significantly higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAG)/DNA ratios, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA scaffolds, respectively. The tribological performance is assessed by determining the friction coefficients of the scaffolds at different loads and sliding velocities. With increasing load or decreasing sliding velocity, the friction coefficient value decreases. PEOT/PBT show to have the lowest friction coefficient value, followed by PCL and P(L\DL)LA. The influence of the scaffold architecture is further determined with PEOT/PBT. Reducing of the fiber spacing results in a lower friction coefficient value. The best and the worst performing scaffold architecture are chosen to investigate the effect of cell culture on the friction coefficient. Matrix deposition is low in the cell-seeded scaffolds and the effect is, therefore, undetermined. Taken together, our studies show that PEOT/PBT scaffolds support better skeletal differentiation of seeded stromal cells and lower friction coefficient compared to PCL and P(L/DL)A scaffolds.

KW - METIS-314051

KW - IR-99859

U2 - 10.1002/adhm.201500067

DO - 10.1002/adhm.201500067

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 232

EP - 243

JO - Advanced healthcare materials

JF - Advanced healthcare materials

SN - 2192-2640

IS - 2

ER -