Branding by Proxy? How hubs market (or not) higher education systems globally: the example of Qatar

Leon Cremonini, John Taylor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter proposes a framework to understand if and how hubs contribute to stronger positioning of higher education system in global competition, and uses the case of Qatar to draw conclusions. Increasingly, governments around the world invest in so-called “education hubs”, which host excellent tertiary providers. Hubs show how, on a global level, new forms of competition between higher education systems are evolving. By being home to top universities, hubs are believed to be both a country’s “branding tool” and a means for developing internal capacity. The analysis suggests that a hub does not necessarily strengthen the national position but may actually reinforce existing inequalities in perceived prestige between systems.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCompetition in Higher Education Branding and Marketing
Subtitle of host publicationNational and Global Perspectives
EditorsAntigoni Papadimitriou
Place of PublicationCham, Switzerland
PublisherPalgrava MacMillan
Pages197-219
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-319-58527-7
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-58526-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Competition
  • higher education hub
  • marketization
  • Qatar higher education

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    Cremonini, L., & Taylor, J. (2017). Branding by Proxy? How hubs market (or not) higher education systems globally: the example of Qatar. In A. Papadimitriou (Ed.), Competition in Higher Education Branding and Marketing: National and Global Perspectives (pp. 197-219). Cham, Switzerland: Palgrava MacMillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58527-7