Children and videogames: leisure activities, aggression, social integration and school performance

Emil G.M. van Schie, Oene Wiegman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

95 Citations (Scopus)
3825 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A survey was conducted among 346 children from the 7th and 8th grade of 7 elementary schools to examine possible positive and negative effects of playing videogames. Analyses revealed that playing videogames did not appear to take place at the expense of children's other leisure activities, social integration, and school performance. A gender difference arose: Boys spent more time playing videogames than did girls. There was no significant relationship between the amount of time children spent on videogames and aggressive behavior. A negative relationship between time spent playing videogames and prosocial behavior was found; however, this relationship did not appear in separate analyses for boys and girls. Furthermore, a positive relationship was found between time spent on videogames and a child's intelligence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1175-1194
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of applied social psychology
Volume27
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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