Cluster-randomised trial of a nurse-led advance care planning session in patients with COPD and their loved ones

Carmen H.M. Houben (Corresponding Author), Martijn A. Spruit, Hans Luyten, Herman Jan Pennings, Vivian E.M. Van Den Boogaart, Jacques P.H.M. Creemers, Geertjan Wesseling, Emiel F.M. Wouters, Daisy J.A. Janssen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Rationale: Advance care planning (ACP) is uncommon in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: To assess whether a nurse-led ACP-intervention can improve quality of patient-physician end-of-life care communication in patients with COPD. Furthermore, the influence of an ACP-intervention on symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients and loved ones was studied. Finally, quality of death and dying was assessed in patients who died during 2-year follow-up. Methods: A multicentre cluster randomised-controlled trial in patients with advanced COPD was performed. The intervention group received an 1.5 hours structured nurse-led ACP-session. Outcomes were: quality of patient-physician end-of-life care communication, prevalence of ACP-discussions 6 months after baseline, symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients and loved ones and quality of death and dying. Results: 165 patients were enrolled (89 intervention; 76 control). The improvement of quality of patient-physician end-of-life care communication was significantly higher in the intervention group compared with the control group (p<0.001). The ACP-intervention was significantly associated with the occurrence of an ACP-discussion with physicians within 6 months (p=0.003). At follow-up, symptoms of anxiety were significantly lower in loved ones in the intervention group compared with the control group (p=0.02). Symptoms of anxiety in patients and symptoms of depression in both patients and loved ones were comparable at follow-up (p>0.05). The quality of death and dying was comparable between both groups (p=0.17). Conclusion: One nurse-led ACP-intervention session improves patient-physician end-of-life care communication without causing psychosocial distress in both patients and loved ones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-336
Number of pages9
JournalThorax
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2019

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Advance Care Planning
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Nurses
Terminal Care
Communication
Physicians
Anxiety
Depression
Quality Improvement

Keywords

  • palliative care

Cite this

Houben, C. H. M., Spruit, M. A., Luyten, H., Pennings, H. J., Van Den Boogaart, V. E. M., Creemers, J. P. H. M., ... Janssen, D. J. A. (2019). Cluster-randomised trial of a nurse-led advance care planning session in patients with COPD and their loved ones. Thorax, 74(4), 328-336. https://doi.org/10.1136/thoraxjnl-2018-211943
Houben, Carmen H.M. ; Spruit, Martijn A. ; Luyten, Hans ; Pennings, Herman Jan ; Van Den Boogaart, Vivian E.M. ; Creemers, Jacques P.H.M. ; Wesseling, Geertjan ; Wouters, Emiel F.M. ; Janssen, Daisy J.A. / Cluster-randomised trial of a nurse-led advance care planning session in patients with COPD and their loved ones. In: Thorax. 2019 ; Vol. 74, No. 4. pp. 328-336.
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Houben, CHM, Spruit, MA, Luyten, H, Pennings, HJ, Van Den Boogaart, VEM, Creemers, JPHM, Wesseling, G, Wouters, EFM & Janssen, DJA 2019, 'Cluster-randomised trial of a nurse-led advance care planning session in patients with COPD and their loved ones' Thorax, vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 328-336. https://doi.org/10.1136/thoraxjnl-2018-211943

Cluster-randomised trial of a nurse-led advance care planning session in patients with COPD and their loved ones. / Houben, Carmen H.M. (Corresponding Author); Spruit, Martijn A.; Luyten, Hans; Pennings, Herman Jan; Van Den Boogaart, Vivian E.M.; Creemers, Jacques P.H.M.; Wesseling, Geertjan; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Janssen, Daisy J.A.

In: Thorax, Vol. 74, No. 4, 14.03.2019, p. 328-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Cluster-randomised trial of a nurse-led advance care planning session in patients with COPD and their loved ones

AU - Houben, Carmen H.M.

AU - Spruit, Martijn A.

AU - Luyten, Hans

AU - Pennings, Herman Jan

AU - Van Den Boogaart, Vivian E.M.

AU - Creemers, Jacques P.H.M.

AU - Wesseling, Geertjan

AU - Wouters, Emiel F.M.

AU - Janssen, Daisy J.A.

PY - 2019/3/14

Y1 - 2019/3/14

N2 - Rationale: Advance care planning (ACP) is uncommon in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: To assess whether a nurse-led ACP-intervention can improve quality of patient-physician end-of-life care communication in patients with COPD. Furthermore, the influence of an ACP-intervention on symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients and loved ones was studied. Finally, quality of death and dying was assessed in patients who died during 2-year follow-up. Methods: A multicentre cluster randomised-controlled trial in patients with advanced COPD was performed. The intervention group received an 1.5 hours structured nurse-led ACP-session. Outcomes were: quality of patient-physician end-of-life care communication, prevalence of ACP-discussions 6 months after baseline, symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients and loved ones and quality of death and dying. Results: 165 patients were enrolled (89 intervention; 76 control). The improvement of quality of patient-physician end-of-life care communication was significantly higher in the intervention group compared with the control group (p<0.001). The ACP-intervention was significantly associated with the occurrence of an ACP-discussion with physicians within 6 months (p=0.003). At follow-up, symptoms of anxiety were significantly lower in loved ones in the intervention group compared with the control group (p=0.02). Symptoms of anxiety in patients and symptoms of depression in both patients and loved ones were comparable at follow-up (p>0.05). The quality of death and dying was comparable between both groups (p=0.17). Conclusion: One nurse-led ACP-intervention session improves patient-physician end-of-life care communication without causing psychosocial distress in both patients and loved ones.

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