CMOS post-processing for monolithic microsystems

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

    Abstract

    The semiconductor industry is adjusting focus towards the so-called “More than Moore‿ innovation. By this is meant that microchip progress may not (or not only) follow from Moore’s Law and its resulting dimensional scaling, but can also come from the addition of new components, new layers and new functions inside the microchip itself. Examples are the introduction of passive RF components, biosensors, and 3D integration. This new innovation paradigm offers great opportunities for the field of microelectronics. Rather than the unidirectional scaling improvements of CMOS and memory technologies, leading to ever higher performance microprocessors and cheaper memory, diversification will lead to entirely new microsystems. Recent examples are the CMOS active pixel sensor, now embedded as cameras in many handheld consumer products, and human-implantable electronics for medical purposes.
    Original languageUndefined
    Title of host publicationNano and Giga Challenges in Electronics, Photonics and Renewable Energy, Nano & Giga 2014
    Place of PublicationTempe, Arizona, USA
    PublisherArizona State University
    Pages-
    Number of pages1
    ISBN (Print)not assigned
    Publication statusPublished - 11 Mar 2014
    EventNano and Giga Challenges in Electronics, Photonics and Renewable Energy, Nano & Giga 2014 - Tempe, United States
    Duration: 10 Mar 201414 Mar 2014

    Publication series

    Name
    PublisherArizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA

    Conference

    ConferenceNano and Giga Challenges in Electronics, Photonics and Renewable Energy, Nano & Giga 2014
    CountryUnited States
    CityTempe
    Period10/03/1414/03/14

    Keywords

    • EWI-25072
    • METIS-306028
    • IR-91832

    Cite this

    Schmitz, J. (2014). CMOS post-processing for monolithic microsystems. In Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics, Photonics and Renewable Energy, Nano & Giga 2014 (pp. -). Tempe, Arizona, USA: Arizona State University.