Complexity-theoretic obstacles to achieving energy savings with near-threshold computing

Antonios Antoniadis, Neal Barcelo, Michael Nugent, Kirk Pruhs, Michele Scquizzato

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the traditional approach to circuit design the supply voltages for each transistor/gate are set sufficiently high so that with sufficiently high probability no transistor fails. One potential method to attain more energy-efficient circuits is Near-Threshold Computing, which simply means that the supply voltages are designed to be closer to the threshold voltage. However, this energy saving comes at a cost of a greater probability of functional failure, which necessitates that the circuits must be more fault tolerant, and thus contain more gates. Thus achieving energy savings with Near-Threshold Computing involves properly balancing the energy used per gate with the number of gates used. We show that if there is a better (in terms of worst-case relative error with respect to energy) method than the traditional approach then P = NP, and thus there is a complexity theoretic obstacle to achieving energy savings with Near-Threshold Computing.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication5th International Green Computing Conference, IGCC 2014
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4799-6177-1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event5th International Green Computing Conference, IGCC 2014 - Dallas, United States
Duration: 3 Nov 20145 Nov 2014
Conference number: 5

Conference

Conference5th International Green Computing Conference, IGCC 2014
Abbreviated titleIGCC
CountryUnited States
CityDallas
Period3/11/145/11/14

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