Composing crosscutting concerns using composition filters

Lodewijk Bergmans, Mehmet Aksit

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    172 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    It has been demonstrated that certain design concerns, such as access control, synchronization, and object interactions cannot be expressed in current OO languages as a separate software module [4, 7]. These so-called crosscutting concerns generally result in implementations scattered over multiple operations. If a crosscutting concern cannot be treated as a single module, its adaptability and reusability are likely to be reduced. A number of programming techniques have been proposed to express crosscutting concerns, for example, adaptive programming [9], AspectJ [8], Hyperspaces [10], and Composition Filters [1]. Here, we present the Composition Filters (CF) model and illustrate how it addresses evolving crosscutting concerns.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)51-57
    Number of pages7
    JournalCommunications
    Volume44
    Issue number19
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

    Fingerprint

    programming
    Reusability
    Chemical analysis
    Access control
    Synchronization
    interaction
    language
    Programming
    Composing
    Filter
    Module
    software
    Language
    Hyperspace
    Adaptability
    Software
    Interaction

    Keywords

    • EWI-930
    • IR-37223
    • METIS-204299

    Cite this

    Bergmans, Lodewijk ; Aksit, Mehmet. / Composing crosscutting concerns using composition filters. In: Communications. 2001 ; Vol. 44, No. 19. pp. 51-57.
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    Composing crosscutting concerns using composition filters. / Bergmans, Lodewijk; Aksit, Mehmet.

    In: Communications, Vol. 44, No. 19, 2001, p. 51-57.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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