Convergence of boundary judgments and innovative regional development concepts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Sustainable regional development is often accompanied by the introduction and gradual implementation of innovative concepts, like, e.g. "integrated natural resources management" or "sustainable tourism". From a managerial perspective, in order to contribute to improved sustainable regional development, the innovative concepts need to become rooted in everyday policy practice in such a way that they enable rather than hinder collective action. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Enabling collective action is a managerial challenge that is partly dependent on the presence of a sufficient degree of integration in the governance system that forms a context for the action. This challenge can be studied with the help of the concept of boundary judgments. Boundary judgments are normative and cognitive perceptions of actors on the relevancy of specific actors, factors, issues, etc. for their domain of action (what is "fit", what is acceptable, what is needed?). The paper illustrates the importance of boundary judgments through two empirical studies in The Netherlands. Findings: Divergent boundary judgments hamper the inclusion of the innovative concept in everyday actions for improving sustainable regional development. However, managers avoiding this complexity by relying on old definitions of their tasks also block the possible innovation. The challenge is to keep the balance between these two extremes. Originality/value: The paper explains and illustrates the concept of "boundary judgments" and their importance for different types of managers (project leaders and policy makers) to take them into account, alongside the more obvious variation of values and interests among stakeholders.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1195-1209
Number of pages15
JournalManagement research review
Volume36
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Regional development
Collective action
Governance
Sustainable tourism
Managers
Innovation
Empirical study
Inclusion
Politicians
Natural resource management
The Netherlands
Design methodology
Project manager
Integrated
Stakeholders
Factors

Keywords

  • IR-87715
  • METIS-298590

Cite this

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title = "Convergence of boundary judgments and innovative regional development concepts",
abstract = "Purpose: Sustainable regional development is often accompanied by the introduction and gradual implementation of innovative concepts, like, e.g. {"}integrated natural resources management{"} or {"}sustainable tourism{"}. From a managerial perspective, in order to contribute to improved sustainable regional development, the innovative concepts need to become rooted in everyday policy practice in such a way that they enable rather than hinder collective action. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Enabling collective action is a managerial challenge that is partly dependent on the presence of a sufficient degree of integration in the governance system that forms a context for the action. This challenge can be studied with the help of the concept of boundary judgments. Boundary judgments are normative and cognitive perceptions of actors on the relevancy of specific actors, factors, issues, etc. for their domain of action (what is {"}fit{"}, what is acceptable, what is needed?). The paper illustrates the importance of boundary judgments through two empirical studies in The Netherlands. Findings: Divergent boundary judgments hamper the inclusion of the innovative concept in everyday actions for improving sustainable regional development. However, managers avoiding this complexity by relying on old definitions of their tasks also block the possible innovation. The challenge is to keep the balance between these two extremes. Originality/value: The paper explains and illustrates the concept of {"}boundary judgments{"} and their importance for different types of managers (project leaders and policy makers) to take them into account, alongside the more obvious variation of values and interests among stakeholders.",
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Convergence of boundary judgments and innovative regional development concepts. / Bressers, Johannes T.A.; Boer, C.L.

In: Management research review, Vol. 36, No. 12, 2013, p. 1195-1209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - Purpose: Sustainable regional development is often accompanied by the introduction and gradual implementation of innovative concepts, like, e.g. "integrated natural resources management" or "sustainable tourism". From a managerial perspective, in order to contribute to improved sustainable regional development, the innovative concepts need to become rooted in everyday policy practice in such a way that they enable rather than hinder collective action. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Enabling collective action is a managerial challenge that is partly dependent on the presence of a sufficient degree of integration in the governance system that forms a context for the action. This challenge can be studied with the help of the concept of boundary judgments. Boundary judgments are normative and cognitive perceptions of actors on the relevancy of specific actors, factors, issues, etc. for their domain of action (what is "fit", what is acceptable, what is needed?). The paper illustrates the importance of boundary judgments through two empirical studies in The Netherlands. Findings: Divergent boundary judgments hamper the inclusion of the innovative concept in everyday actions for improving sustainable regional development. However, managers avoiding this complexity by relying on old definitions of their tasks also block the possible innovation. The challenge is to keep the balance between these two extremes. Originality/value: The paper explains and illustrates the concept of "boundary judgments" and their importance for different types of managers (project leaders and policy makers) to take them into account, alongside the more obvious variation of values and interests among stakeholders.

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