Cut-and-Paste file-systems: integrating simulators and file systems

H.G.P. Bosch, Sape J. Mullender

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    Abstract

    We have implemented an integrated and configurable file system called the PFS and a trace-driven file-system simulator called Patsy. Patsy is used for off-line analysis of file-system algorithms, PFS is used for on-line file-system data storage. Algorithms are first analyzed in Patsy and when we are satisfied with the performance results, migrated into PFS for on-line usage. Since Patsy and PFS are derived from a common cut-and-paste file-system framework, this migration proceeds smoothly. We have found this integration quite useful: algorithm bottlenecks have been found through Patsy that could have led to performance degradations in PFS. Off-line simulators are simpler to analyze compared to on-line file-systems because a work load can repeatedly be replayed on the same off-line simulator. This is almost impossible in on-line file-systems since it is hard to provide similar conditions for each experiment run. Since simulator and file-system are integrated (hence, use the same code), experiment results from the simulator have relevance in the real system. This paper describes the cut-and-paste framework, the instantiation of the framework to PFS and Patsy and finally, some of the experiments we conducted in Patsy.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the USENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference
    Subtitle of host publication January 22-26, 1996, San Diego, California, USA
    Place of PublicationBerkeley, CA
    PublisherUSENIX
    Number of pages12
    ISBN (Print)9781880446768
    Publication statusPublished - 25 Jan 1996
    EventUSENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference - San Diego, United States
    Duration: 22 Jan 199626 Jan 1996

    Conference

    ConferenceUSENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Diego
    Period22/01/9626/01/96

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    Simulators
    Experiments
    Data storage equipment
    Degradation

    Keywords

    • METIS-119519
    • IR-75415

    Cite this

    Bosch, H. G. P., & Mullender, S. J. (1996). Cut-and-Paste file-systems: integrating simulators and file systems. In Proceedings of the USENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference: January 22-26, 1996, San Diego, California, USA Berkeley, CA: USENIX.
    Bosch, H.G.P. ; Mullender, Sape J. / Cut-and-Paste file-systems : integrating simulators and file systems. Proceedings of the USENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference: January 22-26, 1996, San Diego, California, USA. Berkeley, CA : USENIX, 1996.
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    Bosch, HGP & Mullender, SJ 1996, Cut-and-Paste file-systems: integrating simulators and file systems. in Proceedings of the USENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference: January 22-26, 1996, San Diego, California, USA. USENIX, Berkeley, CA, USENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference, San Diego, United States, 22/01/96.

    Cut-and-Paste file-systems : integrating simulators and file systems. / Bosch, H.G.P.; Mullender, Sape J.

    Proceedings of the USENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference: January 22-26, 1996, San Diego, California, USA. Berkeley, CA : USENIX, 1996.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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    N2 - We have implemented an integrated and configurable file system called the PFS and a trace-driven file-system simulator called Patsy. Patsy is used for off-line analysis of file-system algorithms, PFS is used for on-line file-system data storage. Algorithms are first analyzed in Patsy and when we are satisfied with the performance results, migrated into PFS for on-line usage. Since Patsy and PFS are derived from a common cut-and-paste file-system framework, this migration proceeds smoothly. We have found this integration quite useful: algorithm bottlenecks have been found through Patsy that could have led to performance degradations in PFS. Off-line simulators are simpler to analyze compared to on-line file-systems because a work load can repeatedly be replayed on the same off-line simulator. This is almost impossible in on-line file-systems since it is hard to provide similar conditions for each experiment run. Since simulator and file-system are integrated (hence, use the same code), experiment results from the simulator have relevance in the real system. This paper describes the cut-and-paste framework, the instantiation of the framework to PFS and Patsy and finally, some of the experiments we conducted in Patsy.

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    Bosch HGP, Mullender SJ. Cut-and-Paste file-systems: integrating simulators and file systems. In Proceedings of the USENIX 1996 Annual Technical Conference: January 22-26, 1996, San Diego, California, USA. Berkeley, CA: USENIX. 1996