Cycling strategies of young and older cyclists

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study concentrates on the cycling strategies of older cyclists (54–62 year olds) in comparison to young cyclists (20–30 year olds). While cycling in a safe laboratory set-up, controlled lateral perturbations are applied to the rear of the bicycle. Three possible strategies to keep balance are analysed for a young and older aged group: steering, lateral trunk movement and outward knee movement. Older subjects appear to rely more on knee movement as a control mechanism than young subjects. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis revealed that the older adults need more effort to counteract high frequency perturbations. Increased inter-individual variation for the older adults subject group suggests that this group can be seen as a transition group in terms of physical fitness. This explains their increased risk in single-sided bicycle accidents (i.e. accidents involving the cyclist only). Therefore, older cyclists could benefit from improving the stability of cycling at lower speeds.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-195
JournalHuman movement science
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Accidents
Knee
Physical Fitness

Keywords

  • METIS-315248
  • IR-99744

Cite this

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title = "Cycling strategies of young and older cyclists",
abstract = "This study concentrates on the cycling strategies of older cyclists (54–62 year olds) in comparison to young cyclists (20–30 year olds). While cycling in a safe laboratory set-up, controlled lateral perturbations are applied to the rear of the bicycle. Three possible strategies to keep balance are analysed for a young and older aged group: steering, lateral trunk movement and outward knee movement. Older subjects appear to rely more on knee movement as a control mechanism than young subjects. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis revealed that the older adults need more effort to counteract high frequency perturbations. Increased inter-individual variation for the older adults subject group suggests that this group can be seen as a transition group in terms of physical fitness. This explains their increased risk in single-sided bicycle accidents (i.e. accidents involving the cyclist only). Therefore, older cyclists could benefit from improving the stability of cycling at lower speeds.",
keywords = "METIS-315248, IR-99744",
author = "Bulsink, {Vera Elisabeth} and H. Kiewiet and {van de Belt}, Dorien and Bonnema, {Gerrit Maarten} and Koopman, {Hubertus F.J.M.}",
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Cycling strategies of young and older cyclists. / Bulsink, Vera Elisabeth; Kiewiet, H.; van de Belt, Dorien; Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

In: Human movement science, Vol. 46, 2016, p. 184-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cycling strategies of young and older cyclists

AU - Bulsink, Vera Elisabeth

AU - Kiewiet, H.

AU - van de Belt, Dorien

AU - Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten

AU - Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

PY - 2016

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N2 - This study concentrates on the cycling strategies of older cyclists (54–62 year olds) in comparison to young cyclists (20–30 year olds). While cycling in a safe laboratory set-up, controlled lateral perturbations are applied to the rear of the bicycle. Three possible strategies to keep balance are analysed for a young and older aged group: steering, lateral trunk movement and outward knee movement. Older subjects appear to rely more on knee movement as a control mechanism than young subjects. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis revealed that the older adults need more effort to counteract high frequency perturbations. Increased inter-individual variation for the older adults subject group suggests that this group can be seen as a transition group in terms of physical fitness. This explains their increased risk in single-sided bicycle accidents (i.e. accidents involving the cyclist only). Therefore, older cyclists could benefit from improving the stability of cycling at lower speeds.

AB - This study concentrates on the cycling strategies of older cyclists (54–62 year olds) in comparison to young cyclists (20–30 year olds). While cycling in a safe laboratory set-up, controlled lateral perturbations are applied to the rear of the bicycle. Three possible strategies to keep balance are analysed for a young and older aged group: steering, lateral trunk movement and outward knee movement. Older subjects appear to rely more on knee movement as a control mechanism than young subjects. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis revealed that the older adults need more effort to counteract high frequency perturbations. Increased inter-individual variation for the older adults subject group suggests that this group can be seen as a transition group in terms of physical fitness. This explains their increased risk in single-sided bicycle accidents (i.e. accidents involving the cyclist only). Therefore, older cyclists could benefit from improving the stability of cycling at lower speeds.

KW - METIS-315248

KW - IR-99744

U2 - 10.1016/j.humov.2016.01.005

DO - 10.1016/j.humov.2016.01.005

M3 - Article

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SP - 184

EP - 195

JO - Human movement science

JF - Human movement science

SN - 0167-9457

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