Deformability Assessment of Waterborne Protozoa Using a Microfluidic-Enabled Force Microscopy Probe

John S. McGrath, Jos Quist, James Richard Thorley Seddon, Stanley Lai, Serge Joseph Guy Lemay, Helen L. Bridle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
31 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Many modern filtration technologies are incapable of the complete removal of Cryptosporidium oocysts from drinking-water. Consequently, Cryptosporidium-contaminated drinking-water supplies can severely implicate both water utilities and consumers. Existing methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium in drinking-water do not discern between non-pathogenic and pathogenic species, nor between viable and non-viable oocysts. Using FluidFM, a novel force spectroscopy method employing microchannelled cantilevers for single-cell level manipulation, we assessed the size and deformability properties of two species of Cryptosporidium that pose varying levels of risk to human health. A comparison of such characteristics demonstrated the ability of FluidFM to discern between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium parvum with 86% efficiency, whilst using a measurement throughput which exceeded 50 discrete oocysts per hour. In addition, we measured the deformability properties for untreated and temperature-inactivated oocysts of the highly infective, human pathogenic C. parvum to assess whether deformability may be a marker of viability. Our results indicate that untreated and temperature-inactivated C. parvum oocysts had overlapping but significantly different deformability distributions.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0150438
Pages (from-to)e0150438-
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Protozoa
Cryptosporidium
Microfluidics
Oocysts
Atomic Force Microscopy
Formability
oocysts
microscopy
Microscopic examination
Cryptosporidium parvum
Drinking Water
drinking water
Cryptosporidium muris
water utilities
Water supply
Temperature
Water Supply
water supply
Throughput
Health

Keywords

  • IR-103203
  • METIS-320138

Cite this

McGrath, J. S., Quist, J., Seddon, J. R. T., Lai, S., Lemay, S. J. G., & Bridle, H. L. (2016). Deformability Assessment of Waterborne Protozoa Using a Microfluidic-Enabled Force Microscopy Probe. PLoS ONE, 11(3), e0150438-. [e0150438]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150438
McGrath, John S. ; Quist, Jos ; Seddon, James Richard Thorley ; Lai, Stanley ; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy ; Bridle, Helen L. / Deformability Assessment of Waterborne Protozoa Using a Microfluidic-Enabled Force Microscopy Probe. In: PLoS ONE. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. e0150438-.
@article{4184a97aca9c476e969d2c83338de61b,
title = "Deformability Assessment of Waterborne Protozoa Using a Microfluidic-Enabled Force Microscopy Probe",
abstract = "Many modern filtration technologies are incapable of the complete removal of Cryptosporidium oocysts from drinking-water. Consequently, Cryptosporidium-contaminated drinking-water supplies can severely implicate both water utilities and consumers. Existing methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium in drinking-water do not discern between non-pathogenic and pathogenic species, nor between viable and non-viable oocysts. Using FluidFM, a novel force spectroscopy method employing microchannelled cantilevers for single-cell level manipulation, we assessed the size and deformability properties of two species of Cryptosporidium that pose varying levels of risk to human health. A comparison of such characteristics demonstrated the ability of FluidFM to discern between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium parvum with 86{\%} efficiency, whilst using a measurement throughput which exceeded 50 discrete oocysts per hour. In addition, we measured the deformability properties for untreated and temperature-inactivated oocysts of the highly infective, human pathogenic C. parvum to assess whether deformability may be a marker of viability. Our results indicate that untreated and temperature-inactivated C. parvum oocysts had overlapping but significantly different deformability distributions.",
keywords = "IR-103203, METIS-320138",
author = "McGrath, {John S.} and Jos Quist and Seddon, {James Richard Thorley} and Stanley Lai and Lemay, {Serge Joseph Guy} and Bridle, {Helen L.}",
note = "Open access",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0150438",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "e0150438--",
journal = "PLoS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "3",

}

Deformability Assessment of Waterborne Protozoa Using a Microfluidic-Enabled Force Microscopy Probe. / McGrath, John S.; Quist, Jos; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Lai, Stanley; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy; Bridle, Helen L.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 3, e0150438, 2016, p. e0150438-.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Deformability Assessment of Waterborne Protozoa Using a Microfluidic-Enabled Force Microscopy Probe

AU - McGrath, John S.

AU - Quist, Jos

AU - Seddon, James Richard Thorley

AU - Lai, Stanley

AU - Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy

AU - Bridle, Helen L.

N1 - Open access

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Many modern filtration technologies are incapable of the complete removal of Cryptosporidium oocysts from drinking-water. Consequently, Cryptosporidium-contaminated drinking-water supplies can severely implicate both water utilities and consumers. Existing methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium in drinking-water do not discern between non-pathogenic and pathogenic species, nor between viable and non-viable oocysts. Using FluidFM, a novel force spectroscopy method employing microchannelled cantilevers for single-cell level manipulation, we assessed the size and deformability properties of two species of Cryptosporidium that pose varying levels of risk to human health. A comparison of such characteristics demonstrated the ability of FluidFM to discern between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium parvum with 86% efficiency, whilst using a measurement throughput which exceeded 50 discrete oocysts per hour. In addition, we measured the deformability properties for untreated and temperature-inactivated oocysts of the highly infective, human pathogenic C. parvum to assess whether deformability may be a marker of viability. Our results indicate that untreated and temperature-inactivated C. parvum oocysts had overlapping but significantly different deformability distributions.

AB - Many modern filtration technologies are incapable of the complete removal of Cryptosporidium oocysts from drinking-water. Consequently, Cryptosporidium-contaminated drinking-water supplies can severely implicate both water utilities and consumers. Existing methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium in drinking-water do not discern between non-pathogenic and pathogenic species, nor between viable and non-viable oocysts. Using FluidFM, a novel force spectroscopy method employing microchannelled cantilevers for single-cell level manipulation, we assessed the size and deformability properties of two species of Cryptosporidium that pose varying levels of risk to human health. A comparison of such characteristics demonstrated the ability of FluidFM to discern between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium parvum with 86% efficiency, whilst using a measurement throughput which exceeded 50 discrete oocysts per hour. In addition, we measured the deformability properties for untreated and temperature-inactivated oocysts of the highly infective, human pathogenic C. parvum to assess whether deformability may be a marker of viability. Our results indicate that untreated and temperature-inactivated C. parvum oocysts had overlapping but significantly different deformability distributions.

KW - IR-103203

KW - METIS-320138

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0150438

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0150438

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - e0150438-

JO - PLoS ONE

JF - PLoS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 3

M1 - e0150438

ER -