Design and test of a hands-free tracheostoma valve to improve the rehabilitation process after laryngectomy

G.J. Verkerke, A. Veenstra, H.K. Schutte, I.F. Herrmann, G. Rakhorst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The surgical treatment of throat cancer often requires total laryngectomy. The necessary tracheostoma attracts attention, especially during speech, when one must close it manually to force air into the esophagus. To avoid this manual control, several devices have been developed. These must be placed in or around the tracheostoma and possess a valve which closes with a large air flow value. Most devices have a major drawback; coughing calls for manual adaptation, which again attracts attention. A new hands-free tracheostoma valve has been developed. The device consists of two magnetic valves, one which closes the outflow to allow speech, and one which opens to cough. Prototypes were tested in a physical model. Air flow resistance and closing pressures of the speech valve proved to be comparable to those of existing devices. Patients were enthusiastic about the new approach, even though air leakage sometimes occurred.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-182
Number of pages8
JournalInternational journal of artificial organs
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1994
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Air flow resistance
  • Artificial larynx
  • Laryngectomy
  • Tracheostoma
  • Tracheostoma valve
  • Voice prostheses
  • Voice rehabilitation

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