Developing a framework for assessing the impact of geothermal development phases on ecosystem services

Jarot M. Semedi (Corresponding Author), L. Willemen, Triarko Nurlambang, F.D. Van Der Meer, Raldi H. Koestoer

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Abstract

The 2014 Indonesian National Energy Policy has set a target to provide national primary energy usage reached 2.500 kWh per capita in the year 2025 and reached 7.000 kWh in the year 2050. The National Energy Policy state that the development of energy should consider the balance of energy economic values, energy supply security, and the conservation of the environment. This has led to the prioritization of renewable energy sources. Geothermal energy a renewable energy source that produces low carbon emissions and is widely available in Indonesia due to the country's location in the "volcanic arc". The development of geothermal energy faces several problems related to its potential locations in Indonesia. The potential sites for geothermal energy are mostly located in the volcanic landscapes that have a high hazard risk and are often designated protected areas. Local community low knowledge of geothermal use also a challenge for geothermal development where sometimes strong local culture stand in the way. Each phase of geothermal energy development (exploration, construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning) will have an impact on the landscape and everyone living in it. Meanwhile, natural and other human-induced drivers will keep landscapes and environments changing. This conference paper addresses the development of an integrated assessment to spatially measure the impact of geothermal energy development phases on ecosystem services. Listing the effects on the ecosystem services induced by each geothermal development phases and estimating the spatial impact using Geographic Information System (GIS) will result in an overview on where and how much each geothermal development phase affects the ecosystem and how this information could be included to improve national spatial planning.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012003
Number of pages7
JournalIOP conference series: Earth and environmental science
Volume103
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2018

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geothermal energy
ecosystem service
energy policy
decommissioning
prioritization
spatial planning
carbon emission
island arc
energy
protected area
hazard
ecosystem
renewable energy source

Keywords

  • ITC-GOLD

Cite this

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Developing a framework for assessing the impact of geothermal development phases on ecosystem services. / Semedi, Jarot M. (Corresponding Author); Willemen, L.; Nurlambang, Triarko; Van Der Meer, F.D.; Koestoer, Raldi H.

In: IOP conference series: Earth and environmental science, Vol. 103, No. 1, 012003, 10.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Semedi, Jarot M.

AU - Willemen, L.

AU - Nurlambang, Triarko

AU - Van Der Meer, F.D.

AU - Koestoer, Raldi H.

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AB - The 2014 Indonesian National Energy Policy has set a target to provide national primary energy usage reached 2.500 kWh per capita in the year 2025 and reached 7.000 kWh in the year 2050. The National Energy Policy state that the development of energy should consider the balance of energy economic values, energy supply security, and the conservation of the environment. This has led to the prioritization of renewable energy sources. Geothermal energy a renewable energy source that produces low carbon emissions and is widely available in Indonesia due to the country's location in the "volcanic arc". The development of geothermal energy faces several problems related to its potential locations in Indonesia. The potential sites for geothermal energy are mostly located in the volcanic landscapes that have a high hazard risk and are often designated protected areas. Local community low knowledge of geothermal use also a challenge for geothermal development where sometimes strong local culture stand in the way. Each phase of geothermal energy development (exploration, construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning) will have an impact on the landscape and everyone living in it. Meanwhile, natural and other human-induced drivers will keep landscapes and environments changing. This conference paper addresses the development of an integrated assessment to spatially measure the impact of geothermal energy development phases on ecosystem services. Listing the effects on the ecosystem services induced by each geothermal development phases and estimating the spatial impact using Geographic Information System (GIS) will result in an overview on where and how much each geothermal development phase affects the ecosystem and how this information could be included to improve national spatial planning.

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DO - 10.1088/1755-1315/103/1/012003

M3 - Article

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JO - IOP conference series: Earth and environmental science

JF - IOP conference series: Earth and environmental science

SN - 1755-1307

IS - 1

M1 - 012003

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