Developing and Testing a Tool to Evaluate BIM Maturity: Sectoral Analysis in the Dutch Construction Industry

Sander Siebelink, Johannes T. Voordijk* (Corresponding Author), Arjen Adriaanse

*Corresponding author for this work

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    2 Citations (Scopus)
    3 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This study's objective was to evaluate the status of building information modelling (BIM) implementation within the Dutch construction industry by means of a developed BIM maturity tool that could be applied within the construction industry's various disciplines. Existing BIM maturity models tend to focus on technological aspects and have often been developed for specific disciplines. This paper first describes the development of a maturity model that enables the assessment of both technological and organizational aspects of BIM and enables comparison of all the disciplines in the construction supply chain. Second, the applicability of the proposed BIM maturity model is explored by using the model in in-depth interviews at 53 Dutch firms that represent the various disciplines within the construction industry. The output of the testing of the BIM maturity model shed light on the current implementation status of individual companies and, when aggregated, of the subsectors present. The latter information is valuable for sectoral associations because it identifies differences and similarities in BIM implementation across subsectors. The main finding is of strong strategic support for BIM among the leading companies evaluated. However, the formalization of BIM-related processes, tasks, and responsibilities is lagging behind BIM developments. Notably, respondents emphasized aspects related to people and culture when it came to implementing BIM, with awareness, education, and training regarded as essential elements in stimulating BIM maturity growth. Based on these findings, priorities have been identified to stimulate the BIM implementation process that can be included in sector-specific or industry-wide policies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number05018007
    JournalJournal of construction engineering and management
    Volume144
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

    Fingerprint

    Construction industry
    Testing
    Industry
    Supply chains
    Education
    Maturity
    Information modeling
    Sectoral analysis

    Keywords

    • Construction industry
    • Maturity
    • Supply chain management
    • Building information modelling (BIM)

    Cite this

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