Direct Clinical Health Effects of the Consumption of Alcohol Mixed With Energy Drink in Dutch Adolescents

Karin Nienhuis (Corresponding Author), Joris J. van Hoof, Nicolaas van der Lely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The direct clinical health effects of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) consumption are largely unknown. Using data from a nationwide questionnaire, two groups were compared: adolescents who consumed an energy drink at the event (ED+) and adolescents who did not (ED–). Blood alcohol concentration (BAC), duration of loss of consciousness, mean age, sex ratio, and habitual characteristics did not differ between the groups. In the ED+ group, more adolescents had lower education and drugs were used twice as often. Consumption of AmED with relatively low doses of caffeine does not lead to higher BAC in Dutch adolescents presenting to the hospital with alcohol intoxication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-132
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of child & adolescent substance abuse
Volume27
Issue number2
Early online date13 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print/First online - 13 Feb 2018

Fingerprint

Energy Drinks
Alcohol Drinking
alcohol
adolescent
energy
Health
health
Alcoholic Intoxication
Unconsciousness
Sex Ratio
Caffeine
sex ratio
Group
intoxication
energy consumption
Alcohols
consciousness
Education
drug
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D
  • Alcohol intoxication
  • Alcohol mixed with energy drink
  • Direct clinical health effects
  • Adolescents

Cite this

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Direct Clinical Health Effects of the Consumption of Alcohol Mixed With Energy Drink in Dutch Adolescents. / Nienhuis, Karin (Corresponding Author); van Hoof, Joris J.; van der Lely, Nicolaas.

In: Journal of child & adolescent substance abuse, Vol. 27, No. 2, 13.02.2018, p. 125-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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