Do we Know Enough about Requirements Prioritization in Agile Projects: Insights from a Case Study

Z. Racheva, Maia Daneva, Nicolaas Sikkel, Andrea Herrmann, Roelf J. Wieringa

    • 24 Citations

    Abstract

    Requirements prioritization is an essential mechanism of agile software development approaches. It maximizes the value delivered to the clients and accommodates changing requirements. This paper presents results of an exploratory cross-case study on agile prioritization and business value delivery processes in eight software organizations. We found that some explicit and fundamental assumptions of agile requirement prioritization approaches, as described in the agile literature on best practices, do not hold in all agile project contexts in our study. These are (i) the driving role of the client in the value creation process, (ii) the prevailing position of business value as a main prioritization criterion, (iii) the role of the prioritization process for project goal achievement. This implies that these assumptions have to be reframed and that the approaches to requirements prioritization for value creation need to be extended.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference
    Place of PublicationLos Alamitos
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society Press
    Pages147-156
    Number of pages10
    ISBN (Print)978-1-4244-8022-7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Oct 2010
    Event18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2010 - Sydney, Australia

    Publication series

    Name
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society Press

    Conference

    Conference18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2010
    Abbreviated titleRE 2010
    CountryAustralia
    CitySydney
    Period27/09/101/10/10

    Fingerprint

    Software engineering
    Industry

    Keywords

    • METIS-270918
    • Exploratory case study
    • Agile development
    • SCS-Services
    • Requirements Prioritization
    • Value creation
    • EWI-18159
    • IR-72427

    Cite this

    Racheva, Z., Daneva, M., Sikkel, N., Herrmann, A., & Wieringa, R. J. (2010). Do we Know Enough about Requirements Prioritization in Agile Projects: Insights from a Case Study. In 18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference (pp. 147-156). Los Alamitos: IEEE Computer Society Press. DOI: 10.1109/RE.2010.27

    Racheva, Z.; Daneva, Maia; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Herrmann, Andrea; Wieringa, Roelf J. / Do we Know Enough about Requirements Prioritization in Agile Projects: Insights from a Case Study.

    18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference. Los Alamitos : IEEE Computer Society Press, 2010. p. 147-156.

    Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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    Racheva, Z, Daneva, M, Sikkel, N, Herrmann, A & Wieringa, RJ 2010, Do we Know Enough about Requirements Prioritization in Agile Projects: Insights from a Case Study. in 18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference. IEEE Computer Society Press, Los Alamitos, pp. 147-156, 18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2010, Sydney, Australia, 27-1 October. DOI: 10.1109/RE.2010.27

    Do we Know Enough about Requirements Prioritization in Agile Projects: Insights from a Case Study. / Racheva, Z.; Daneva, Maia; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Herrmann, Andrea; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference. Los Alamitos : IEEE Computer Society Press, 2010. p. 147-156.

    Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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    Racheva Z, Daneva M, Sikkel N, Herrmann A, Wieringa RJ. Do we Know Enough about Requirements Prioritization in Agile Projects: Insights from a Case Study. In 18th International IEEE Requirements Engineering Conference. Los Alamitos: IEEE Computer Society Press. 2010. p. 147-156. Available from, DOI: 10.1109/RE.2010.27