Does immediate smart feedback on therapy adherence and inhalation technique improve asthma control in children with uncontrolled asthma? A study protocol of the IMAGINE I study

Esther Sportel*, Martijn Johan Oude Wolcherink, Job van der Palen, Anke Lenferink, Boony J. Thio, Kris L.L. Movig, Marjolein Geertruida Johanna Brusse-Keizer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: Many asthmatic children suffer from uncontrolled asthma with frequent exacerbations, despite an optimal treatment plan using inhalation medication. Studies have shown that therapy adherence and inhalation technique are often suboptimal in asthmatic children, but these have traditionally been hard to measure. A novel device functioning as an add-on to the inhaler has been developed to measure both aspects by recording vibration patterns during inhalation. This data can be converted to smart feedback and provided to patients immediately via a mobile application. The aim of this study is to improve asthma control in children between 6 and 18 years old by providing immediate smart feedback on the intake of inhalation medication. Asthma control will be measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 s, (Childhood) Asthma Control Test ((c-)ACT) score, and lung function variability and reversibility.

Methods: The study will be performed in Medisch Spectrum Twente (Enschede, The Netherlands). The goal is to include 68 uncontrolled moderate to severe asthmatic children between 6 and 18 years old who receive controller inhalation medication through the Nexthaler®, Ellipta®, or Spiromax®. The study consists of three phases. Phase 1 is
observational and will last 4 weeks to observe the baseline adherence and inhalation technique as monitored by the add-on device. A randomised controlled trial lasting 6 weeks will be performed in phase 2. Patients in the intervention group will receive immediate smart feedback about the performed inhalations via a mobile application. In the control group, adherence and inhalation technique will be monitored, but patients will not receive feedback. In phase 3, also lasting 6 weeks, the feedback will be ceased for all children and revision of current therapy may occur, depending on the findings in phase 2. Asthma control can be assessed by means of spirometry (both at home and in the hospital) and (c-)ACT questionnaires.
Original languageEnglish
Article number801
Number of pages11
JournalTrials
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 2020

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