E-care as craftsmanship: virtuous work, skilled engagement, and information technology in health care

Mark Coeckelbergh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett’s work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that “e-care”—care by means of new information and communication technologies—does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds of knowledge involved in care work and their moral significance, this paper explores what “craftsmanship” means in the context of medicine and health care and discusses whether today the care giver’s craftsmanship is eroded. It is argued that this is a real danger, especially under modern conditions and in the case of telecare, but that whether it happens, and to what extent it happens, depends on whether in a specific practice and given a specific technology e-carers can develop the know-how and skill to engage more intensely with those under their care and to cooperate with their co-workers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)807-816
JournalMedicine, health care and philosophy
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Medical Informatics
Biomedical Technology
Caregivers
information technology
health care
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Patient Participation
Quality of Health Care
Communication
Medicine
Equipment and Supplies
co-worker
know how
medicine
electronics
worker
communication

Keywords

  • METIS-294970
  • IR-84586

Cite this

@article{7f4e68fdf3e0417bb977fc01c50ee638,
title = "E-care as craftsmanship: virtuous work, skilled engagement, and information technology in health care",
abstract = "Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett’s work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that “e-care”—care by means of new information and communication technologies—does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds of knowledge involved in care work and their moral significance, this paper explores what “craftsmanship” means in the context of medicine and health care and discusses whether today the care giver’s craftsmanship is eroded. It is argued that this is a real danger, especially under modern conditions and in the case of telecare, but that whether it happens, and to what extent it happens, depends on whether in a specific practice and given a specific technology e-carers can develop the know-how and skill to engage more intensely with those under their care and to cooperate with their co-workers.",
keywords = "METIS-294970, IR-84586",
author = "Mark Coeckelbergh",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1007/s11019-013-9463-7",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "807--816",
journal = "Medicine, health care and philosophy",
issn = "1386-7423",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "4",

}

E-care as craftsmanship: virtuous work, skilled engagement, and information technology in health care. / Coeckelbergh, Mark.

In: Medicine, health care and philosophy, Vol. 16, No. 4, 22.01.2013, p. 807-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - E-care as craftsmanship: virtuous work, skilled engagement, and information technology in health care

AU - Coeckelbergh, Mark

PY - 2013/1/22

Y1 - 2013/1/22

N2 - Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett’s work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that “e-care”—care by means of new information and communication technologies—does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds of knowledge involved in care work and their moral significance, this paper explores what “craftsmanship” means in the context of medicine and health care and discusses whether today the care giver’s craftsmanship is eroded. It is argued that this is a real danger, especially under modern conditions and in the case of telecare, but that whether it happens, and to what extent it happens, depends on whether in a specific practice and given a specific technology e-carers can develop the know-how and skill to engage more intensely with those under their care and to cooperate with their co-workers.

AB - Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett’s work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that “e-care”—care by means of new information and communication technologies—does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds of knowledge involved in care work and their moral significance, this paper explores what “craftsmanship” means in the context of medicine and health care and discusses whether today the care giver’s craftsmanship is eroded. It is argued that this is a real danger, especially under modern conditions and in the case of telecare, but that whether it happens, and to what extent it happens, depends on whether in a specific practice and given a specific technology e-carers can develop the know-how and skill to engage more intensely with those under their care and to cooperate with their co-workers.

KW - METIS-294970

KW - IR-84586

U2 - 10.1007/s11019-013-9463-7

DO - 10.1007/s11019-013-9463-7

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 807

EP - 816

JO - Medicine, health care and philosophy

JF - Medicine, health care and philosophy

SN - 1386-7423

IS - 4

ER -