Early longitudinal development of executive functioning in two to three year olds

Ilona Veer, Cathy van Tuijl, Hans Luyten, Peter Sleegers

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Abstract

Although previous studies have shown that executive functions can affect student learning, longitudinal studies into how executive functions develop in toddlerhood are still scarce. To get more insights into the developmental nature of executive functions , more research is needed into the relationships between different executive function components and how these components and their relationships develop in early childhood. The present study examines the relationships between three basic components of toddlers’ executive functioning (selective attention, working memory and delay of gratification) and how these relationships develop over time. Additionally, differences between children based on ethnic and socio-economic background are discussed. A structural equation model is tested in which the relationships between EF components are hypothesized, using a sample of 284 toddlers of 30 preschools, tested at two waves (at 33 and 39 months of age). Our study shows that selective attention uniquely predicts working memory over time and not delay of gratification
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 25 Aug 2015
Event16th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction (EARLI) 2015: Towards a reflective society: synergies between learning, teaching and research - Limassol, Cyprus
Duration: 25 Aug 201529 Aug 2015
Conference number: 16

Conference

Conference16th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction (EARLI) 2015
Abbreviated titleEARLI
CountryCyprus
CityLimassol
Period25/08/1529/08/15

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