Effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the affected upper extremity in rehabilitation patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Henk van Dijk, M.J.A. Jannink, Hermanus J. Hermens

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    54 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Objective: Assessment of the available evidence regarding the effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect of augmented feedback on motor function. Two reviewers systematically assessed the methodological quality of the trials. The reported effects were examined to evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback and to identify a possible relationship with patient characteristics, type of intervention, or methodological quality.Results: Twenty-six randomized controlled trials were included, 9 of which reported a positive effect on arm function tests. Follow-up measurements were performed in 8 trials, 1 of which reported a positive effect. Different therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback, i.e. electromyographic biofeedback, kinetic feedback, kinematic feedback, or knowledge of results, show no difference in effectiveness.Conclusion: No firm evidence was found of effectiveness regarding the use of augmented feedback to improve motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients. Future studies should focus more on the content, form and timing of augmented feedback concerning the therapeutic intervention. It should be emphasized that motor learning effects can only be determined by re-examining the population after a follow-up period.
    Original languageUndefined
    Pages (from-to)202-211
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of rehabilitation medicine
    Volume37
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2005

    Keywords

    • EWI-18490
    • Upper extremity
    • knowledge of results
    • IR-73511
    • Arm
    • Motor Skills
    • METIS-226506
    • Biofeedback

    Cite this

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    title = "Effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the affected upper extremity in rehabilitation patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials",
    abstract = "Objective: Assessment of the available evidence regarding the effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect of augmented feedback on motor function. Two reviewers systematically assessed the methodological quality of the trials. The reported effects were examined to evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback and to identify a possible relationship with patient characteristics, type of intervention, or methodological quality.Results: Twenty-six randomized controlled trials were included, 9 of which reported a positive effect on arm function tests. Follow-up measurements were performed in 8 trials, 1 of which reported a positive effect. Different therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback, i.e. electromyographic biofeedback, kinetic feedback, kinematic feedback, or knowledge of results, show no difference in effectiveness.Conclusion: No firm evidence was found of effectiveness regarding the use of augmented feedback to improve motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients. Future studies should focus more on the content, form and timing of augmented feedback concerning the therapeutic intervention. It should be emphasized that motor learning effects can only be determined by re-examining the population after a follow-up period.",
    keywords = "EWI-18490, Upper extremity, knowledge of results, IR-73511, Arm, Motor Skills, METIS-226506, Biofeedback",
    author = "{van Dijk}, Henk and M.J.A. Jannink and Hermens, {Hermanus J.}",
    note = "This study was supported by a grant from the Department of Economical Affairs provided to the ExO-Zorg project.",
    year = "2005",
    month = "7",
    day = "4",
    doi = "10.1080/16501970510030165",
    language = "Undefined",
    volume = "37",
    pages = "202--211",
    journal = "Journal of rehabilitation medicine",
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    Effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the affected upper extremity in rehabilitation patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. / van Dijk, Henk; Jannink, M.J.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    In: Journal of rehabilitation medicine, Vol. 37, No. 4, 04.07.2005, p. 202-211.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    T1 - Effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the affected upper extremity in rehabilitation patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    AU - van Dijk, Henk

    AU - Jannink, M.J.A.

    AU - Hermens, Hermanus J.

    N1 - This study was supported by a grant from the Department of Economical Affairs provided to the ExO-Zorg project.

    PY - 2005/7/4

    Y1 - 2005/7/4

    N2 - Objective: Assessment of the available evidence regarding the effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect of augmented feedback on motor function. Two reviewers systematically assessed the methodological quality of the trials. The reported effects were examined to evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback and to identify a possible relationship with patient characteristics, type of intervention, or methodological quality.Results: Twenty-six randomized controlled trials were included, 9 of which reported a positive effect on arm function tests. Follow-up measurements were performed in 8 trials, 1 of which reported a positive effect. Different therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback, i.e. electromyographic biofeedback, kinetic feedback, kinematic feedback, or knowledge of results, show no difference in effectiveness.Conclusion: No firm evidence was found of effectiveness regarding the use of augmented feedback to improve motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients. Future studies should focus more on the content, form and timing of augmented feedback concerning the therapeutic intervention. It should be emphasized that motor learning effects can only be determined by re-examining the population after a follow-up period.

    AB - Objective: Assessment of the available evidence regarding the effect of augmented feedback on motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect of augmented feedback on motor function. Two reviewers systematically assessed the methodological quality of the trials. The reported effects were examined to evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback and to identify a possible relationship with patient characteristics, type of intervention, or methodological quality.Results: Twenty-six randomized controlled trials were included, 9 of which reported a positive effect on arm function tests. Follow-up measurements were performed in 8 trials, 1 of which reported a positive effect. Different therapeutic interventions using augmented feedback, i.e. electromyographic biofeedback, kinetic feedback, kinematic feedback, or knowledge of results, show no difference in effectiveness.Conclusion: No firm evidence was found of effectiveness regarding the use of augmented feedback to improve motor function of the upper extremity in rehabilitation patients. Future studies should focus more on the content, form and timing of augmented feedback concerning the therapeutic intervention. It should be emphasized that motor learning effects can only be determined by re-examining the population after a follow-up period.

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    KW - IR-73511

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    KW - Motor Skills

    KW - METIS-226506

    KW - Biofeedback

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