Effector-independent and effector-dependent learning in the discrete sequence production task

Willem B. Verwey, David L. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined whether skill in the discrete sequence production task involves, apart from the typical effector-independent component, an effector-dependent component. To that end, 12 participants practiced two 5-key sequences, each for 1,060 trials. One group practiced with three fingers of one hand, the other group with three fingers of two hands. In a subsequent test phase, participants in both groups executed the same sequences and two new sequences with the hand configuration they had used during practice, and with the hand configuration of the other group. The results provide support for an effector-dependent component in that both groups performed the practiced sequences faster with the hand configuration they had used during practice than with the hand configuration that was new to them. In addition, the unpracticed hand configuration performed the practiced sequences faster than the new sequence, which demonstrated the effector-independent component.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-70
JournalPsychological research = Psychologische Forschung
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Keywords

  • IR-48208
  • METIS-219533

Cite this

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Effector-independent and effector-dependent learning in the discrete sequence production task. / Verwey, Willem B.; Wright, David L.

In: Psychological research = Psychologische Forschung, Vol. 68, No. 1, 2004, p. 64-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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