Effects of free surface modelling and wave-breaking turbulence on depth-resolved modelling of sediment transport in the swash zone

J.W.M. Kranenborg*, G.H.P. Campmans, J.J. van der Werf, R.T. McCall, A.J.H.M. Reniers, S.J.M.H. Hulscher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

The swash zone is an important region for the coastal morphodynamics. Often, model studies of the swash zone use depth-averaged models. These models typically assume a vertically uniform velocity and sand concentration for calculating the sand transport flux. However, this assumption is not always accurate in the swash zone. In order to investigate the vertical distribution of velocity and sand, we use a depth-resolving model that is able to capture these vertical variations. We simulate the flow and suspended sediment transport induced by bichromatic waves using a 2DV depth-resolving RANS model. Our verification of the model shows that special care needs to be taken to deal with bubbles in 2DV simulations. Furthermore, we show that turning off the (Wilcox, 2006, 2008) limiter for turbulence, increases the modelled turbulent kinetic energy that is induced by wave-breaking, resulting in improved predictions of sediment concentrations. Using the depth-resolving model, we show that the vertical distribution of velocity and sand is far from uniform in the swash zone. The results show that if one assumes vertically uniform depth-averaged velocities and concentrations, one can overpredict the sediment flux by 50%.
Original languageEnglish
Article number104519
Number of pages19
JournalCoastal engineering
Volume191
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2024

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D
  • Morphodynamics
  • OpenFOAM
  • RANS
  • Sand transport
  • Numerical modelling
  • Swash zone

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