Electoral Systems and Government Arrangements: Preferences of Parliamentary Candidates in Germany, the Netherlands and New Zealand

Jeffrey A. Karp, Hermann Schmitt, Andreas M. Wüst

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    Abstract

    We examine elite support for electoral arrangements in Germany and New Zealand. Both countries share a mixed electoral system (MMP) that combines single member districts with proportional representation. New Zealand's experience with MMP is relatively brief, having held just three elections since 1996 while Germany's experience dates back to the 1950s. Using data collected through surveys of parliamentary candidates we consider how various factors such as partisan self-interest, minority status, incumbency, ideology, and attitudes about candidate selection structure support for the electoral system. We find strong overall support for MMP in both countries, with small parties and those to the left of the ideological spectrum being most supportive of the system. Those who are dissatisfied with MMP are likely to be those dissatisfied with the candidate selection process or those in the opposition.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages28
    Publication statusPublished - 28 Aug 2003
    Event99th Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (APSA) 2003 - Philadelphia, United States
    Duration: 28 Aug 200331 Aug 2003

    Conference

    Conference99th Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (APSA) 2003
    CountryUnited States
    CityPhiladelphia
    Period28/08/0331/08/03

    Keywords

    • METIS-214642

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    Karp, J. A., Schmitt, H., & Wüst, A. M. (2003). Electoral Systems and Government Arrangements: Preferences of Parliamentary Candidates in Germany, the Netherlands and New Zealand. Paper presented at 99th Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (APSA) 2003, Philadelphia, United States.