Establishing cooperation and eliciting information: Semi-cooperative sources’ affective resistance and cognitive strategies

Simon Oleszkiewicz, Pär Anders Granhag

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

One way to gather information from sources and informants is to kindly ask for it. A second way is to ask again using a more strict tone of voice. These ways seldom pay off. But what definitely follows is that the subject becomes aware of the interviewer’s information interests. A better way is to discreetly draw out the information, to elicit the information needed.Approaches that play on elicitation are different from explicit approaches, as they aim to unobtrusively steer the conversation toward a specific topic and then subtly collect details.
In this chapter we first define elicitation and we clarify why the term is relevant.We then contrast resistance postures with counter-interview strategies in order to illustrate various moti- vations of semi-cooperative subjects. Finally, we summarize parts of the experimental work on interview techniques and tactics that aim to (i) increase the subject’s cooperation, and (ii) elicit new information.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge International Handbook of Legal and Investigative Psychology
EditorsRay Bull, Iris Blandón-Gitlin
PublisherRoutledge Tailor & Francis Group
Chapter17
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9780429326530
ISBN (Print)9780367345570
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

Publication series

NameRoutledge International Handbooks

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